Imaging Tissue Engineered Blood Vessel Mimics with Optical Coherence Tomography

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194969
Title:
Imaging Tissue Engineered Blood Vessel Mimics with Optical Coherence Tomography
Author:
Bonnema, Garret
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technology that enables 2D cross-sectional images of tissue microstructure. This interferometric technique provides resolutions of approximately 10-20 um with a penetration depth of 1-2 mm in highly scattering tissues. With the use of fiber optics, OCT systems have been developed for intravascular imaging with a demonstrated improvement in both resolution and dynamic range compared to commercial intravascular ultrasound systems. OCT studies of normal, atherosclerotic, and stented arteries indicate the ability of OCT to visualize arterial structures. These results suggest OCT may be a valuable tool for studying luminal structures in tissue engineered constructs.In the present study, new endoscopic OCT systems and analysis techniques were developed to visualize the growth and response of the cellular lining within a tissue engineered blood vessel mimic (BVM). The BVM consists of two primary components. A biocompatible polymeric scaffold is used to form the tubular structure. Human microvessel cells from adipose tissue are sodded on to the inner surface of the scaffold. These constructs are then developed and imaged within a sterile bioreactor.Three specific aims were defined for the present study. First, an OCT longitudinal scanning endoscope was developed. With this endoscope, a study of 16 BVMs was performed comparing images from OCT and corresponding histological sections. The study demonstrated that endoscopic imaging did not visually damage the mimic cellular lining. OCT images showed excellent correlation with corresponding histologicalsections. Second, a concentric three element endoscope was developed to provide radial cross-sections of the BVM. OCT images using this endoscope monitored lining development on three types of polymeric scaffolds. In the third specific aim, automated algorithms were developed to assess the percent cellular coverage of a stent using volumetric OCT images.The results of the present study suggest that OCT endoscopic systems may be a valuable tool for assessing and optimizing the development of tissue engineered constructs. Conversely, the BVMs modeled the arterial response to deployed stents allowing the development of automated OCT analysis software. These results suggest that blood vessel mimics may be used to advance OCT technology and techniques.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
optical coherence tomography; tissue engineering; endoscopy; bioreactor; catheter; blood vessel mimic
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barton, Jennifer K.
Committee Chair:
Barton, Jennifer K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleImaging Tissue Engineered Blood Vessel Mimics with Optical Coherence Tomographyen_US
dc.creatorBonnema, Garreten_US
dc.contributor.authorBonnema, Garreten_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOptical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technology that enables 2D cross-sectional images of tissue microstructure. This interferometric technique provides resolutions of approximately 10-20 um with a penetration depth of 1-2 mm in highly scattering tissues. With the use of fiber optics, OCT systems have been developed for intravascular imaging with a demonstrated improvement in both resolution and dynamic range compared to commercial intravascular ultrasound systems. OCT studies of normal, atherosclerotic, and stented arteries indicate the ability of OCT to visualize arterial structures. These results suggest OCT may be a valuable tool for studying luminal structures in tissue engineered constructs.In the present study, new endoscopic OCT systems and analysis techniques were developed to visualize the growth and response of the cellular lining within a tissue engineered blood vessel mimic (BVM). The BVM consists of two primary components. A biocompatible polymeric scaffold is used to form the tubular structure. Human microvessel cells from adipose tissue are sodded on to the inner surface of the scaffold. These constructs are then developed and imaged within a sterile bioreactor.Three specific aims were defined for the present study. First, an OCT longitudinal scanning endoscope was developed. With this endoscope, a study of 16 BVMs was performed comparing images from OCT and corresponding histological sections. The study demonstrated that endoscopic imaging did not visually damage the mimic cellular lining. OCT images showed excellent correlation with corresponding histologicalsections. Second, a concentric three element endoscope was developed to provide radial cross-sections of the BVM. OCT images using this endoscope monitored lining development on three types of polymeric scaffolds. In the third specific aim, automated algorithms were developed to assess the percent cellular coverage of a stent using volumetric OCT images.The results of the present study suggest that OCT endoscopic systems may be a valuable tool for assessing and optimizing the development of tissue engineered constructs. Conversely, the BVMs modeled the arterial response to deployed stents allowing the development of automated OCT analysis software. These results suggest that blood vessel mimics may be used to advance OCT technology and techniques.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectoptical coherence tomographyen_US
dc.subjecttissue engineeringen_US
dc.subjectendoscopyen_US
dc.subjectbioreactoren_US
dc.subjectcatheteren_US
dc.subjectblood vessel mimicen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwigerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Ursen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Stuart K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2594en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749593en_US
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