The Influence of Poetry Upon James Mulholland's Compositional Process and Musical Style

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194964
Title:
The Influence of Poetry Upon James Mulholland's Compositional Process and Musical Style
Author:
Thornton, Tony
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
According to James Mulholland, choral works in which the composer begins by using the text to inspire creativity evolve in three stages. First, the poet carefully chooses words and expressions as a vehicle for thoughts and emotions. The composer, in the second stage, enhances the artistic impact of the poem by setting it to music. In the final stage, conductor and performers give voice to the poet's work and to the composer's musical expression of it in a live performance.Choral conductors serve two art forms, language and music. In this study, I will investigate the compositional process and musical style of James Mulholland in five of his choral works, focusing on the composer's use of scansion (measurement of metrical patterns in each line of poetry), vocalization, imagery, and Leitmotif to express the text. The choral works to be studied include Heart, we will forget him! (Emily Dickinson), Fulfillment (Anonymous), The Wild Honeysuckle (Philip Freneau), What lips my lips have kissed (Edna St. Vincent Millay), and If love should count you worthy (attributed to Sidney Royse Lysaght). These pieces were chosen in consultation with the composer to represent his general style. My desire to survey a variety of poets was an additional consideration.Although the focus of my study lies in the second stage of the evolution of a choral work (the setting of the text by the composer), I suggest rehearsal considerations based upon my research. To provide historical context highlighting the circumstances under which each poem was written, poets' biographies (where applicable) are included. Additionally, a synopsis of each poem will provide a cursory understanding of its meaning. Familiarity with the poem's historical context and basic vocabulary is essential to the performance in order to clearly communicate the emotion of the text to a live audience.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
James Mulholland; poetry and music; Tony Thornton; Edna St. Vincent Millay; Butler University
Degree Name:
DMA
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Chamberlain, Bruce

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Poetry Upon James Mulholland's Compositional Process and Musical Styleen_US
dc.creatorThornton, Tonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Tonyen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccording to James Mulholland, choral works in which the composer begins by using the text to inspire creativity evolve in three stages. First, the poet carefully chooses words and expressions as a vehicle for thoughts and emotions. The composer, in the second stage, enhances the artistic impact of the poem by setting it to music. In the final stage, conductor and performers give voice to the poet's work and to the composer's musical expression of it in a live performance.Choral conductors serve two art forms, language and music. In this study, I will investigate the compositional process and musical style of James Mulholland in five of his choral works, focusing on the composer's use of scansion (measurement of metrical patterns in each line of poetry), vocalization, imagery, and Leitmotif to express the text. The choral works to be studied include Heart, we will forget him! (Emily Dickinson), Fulfillment (Anonymous), The Wild Honeysuckle (Philip Freneau), What lips my lips have kissed (Edna St. Vincent Millay), and If love should count you worthy (attributed to Sidney Royse Lysaght). These pieces were chosen in consultation with the composer to represent his general style. My desire to survey a variety of poets was an additional consideration.Although the focus of my study lies in the second stage of the evolution of a choral work (the setting of the text by the composer), I suggest rehearsal considerations based upon my research. To provide historical context highlighting the circumstances under which each poem was written, poets' biographies (where applicable) are included. Additionally, a synopsis of each poem will provide a cursory understanding of its meaning. Familiarity with the poem's historical context and basic vocabulary is essential to the performance in order to clearly communicate the emotion of the text to a live audience.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectJames Mulhollanden_US
dc.subjectpoetry and musicen_US
dc.subjectTony Thorntonen_US
dc.subjectEdna St. Vincent Millayen_US
dc.subjectButler Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDMAen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairChamberlain, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChamberlain, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchauer, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHanson, Greggen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2779en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749813en_US
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