Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194963
Title:
Three Problems of Direct Inference
Author:
Thorn, Paul Darren
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Direct inference consists in inference from a premise describing the incidence of a property among a given population to a conclusion about the likelihood of a particular element of the population having the property in question. For example, from the premise that 2% of American males are doctors one may, in appropriate circumstances, draw the conclusion that the probability is 0.02 that Joe, a particular American male, is a doctor. Despite the apparent centrality of direct inference to human belief formation, the manner in which direct inference is to be justified is not well understood. Similarly, no one has succeeded (or even claimed to succeed) in articulating adequate criteria that specify the conditions under which respective instances of direct inference are correct. My dissertation addresses the three most well know problems of direct inference.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Philosophy; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pollock, John L.
Committee Chair:
Pollock, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThree Problems of Direct Inferenceen_US
dc.creatorThorn, Paul Darrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorThorn, Paul Darrenen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDirect inference consists in inference from a premise describing the incidence of a property among a given population to a conclusion about the likelihood of a particular element of the population having the property in question. For example, from the premise that 2% of American males are doctors one may, in appropriate circumstances, draw the conclusion that the probability is 0.02 that Joe, a particular American male, is a doctor. Despite the apparent centrality of direct inference to human belief formation, the manner in which direct inference is to be justified is not well understood. Similarly, no one has succeeded (or even claimed to succeed) in articulating adequate criteria that specify the conditions under which respective instances of direct inference are correct. My dissertation addresses the three most well know problems of direct inference.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPollock, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairPollock, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHorgan, Terenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLavine, Shaughanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2466en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748383en_US
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