Mnemonic Techniques for Improving Young Children's Prose Learning: Providing versus Constructing Illustrations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194949
Title:
Mnemonic Techniques for Improving Young Children's Prose Learning: Providing versus Constructing Illustrations
Author:
Theodosiou, Gabriella
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The major purpose of the current study was to compare four different instructional variations (providing or constructing either representational or mnemonic pictures) to determine which approach is best for improving second and third-grade students' prose learning. The four experimental conditions directly compared the immediate and delayed memory benefits associated with these four approaches. The to-be-learned materials consisted of passages describing prehistoric animals and their distinguishing characteristics. Findings indicated an overall mnemonic advantage on both the immediate and delayed tests. No memory benefits appeared to be associated with picture construction. These results are in agreement with previous research findings that demonstrated the prose-learning superiority of mnemonic illustrations in comparison to representational pictures.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Levin, Joel R.
Committee Chair:
Levin, Joel R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMnemonic Techniques for Improving Young Children's Prose Learning: Providing versus Constructing Illustrationsen_US
dc.creatorTheodosiou, Gabriellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTheodosiou, Gabriellaen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe major purpose of the current study was to compare four different instructional variations (providing or constructing either representational or mnemonic pictures) to determine which approach is best for improving second and third-grade students' prose learning. The four experimental conditions directly compared the immediate and delayed memory benefits associated with these four approaches. The to-be-learned materials consisted of passages describing prehistoric animals and their distinguishing characteristics. Findings indicated an overall mnemonic advantage on both the immediate and delayed tests. No memory benefits appeared to be associated with picture construction. These results are in agreement with previous research findings that demonstrated the prose-learning superiority of mnemonic illustrations in comparison to representational pictures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLevin, Joel R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairLevin, Joel R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberD'Agostino, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1141en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354160en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.