Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194939
Title:
A Tunable Snapshot Imaging Spectrometer
Author:
Tebow, Christopher
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A tunable snapshot imaging spectrometer has been demonstrated. A liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC SLM) has been integrated into a computed tomographic imaging spectrometer (CTIS) to achieve tunability. The LC SLM allows for rapid, programmable, and non-mechanical alteration of its phase profile by the application of appropriate voltages to its transparent electrodes.The goal of this dissertation is twofold: (1) to integrate a liquid crystal spatial light modulator into a CTIS instrument and characterize its performance as a tunable CTIS disperser, and (2) to implement tunability by analyzing different CTIS configurations.The theoretical model of CTIS operation, calibration, reconstruction, and disperser design are covered in detail. The cross talk of the LC SLM forces the use of a feedback design algorithm rather than designing the desired phase profile a priori in the computer. The modifications to the current polychromatic linear inversion technique for use with the LC SLM in feedback are presented. The result of the modifications is the successful integration of a reprogrammable (i.e. tunable) disperser for the CTIS instrument.The implementation of tunability is explored by analyzing the spectral resolution of a reconstructed point source for different disperser configurations. A method for experimentally determining the CTIS spectral resolution is presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
imaging spectrometer; computer generated hologram; liquid crystal spatial light modulator; optical phased array; computed tomographic imaging spectrometer
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dereniak, Eustace L.
Committee Chair:
Dereniak, Eustace L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Tunable Snapshot Imaging Spectrometeren_US
dc.creatorTebow, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorTebow, Christopheren_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA tunable snapshot imaging spectrometer has been demonstrated. A liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC SLM) has been integrated into a computed tomographic imaging spectrometer (CTIS) to achieve tunability. The LC SLM allows for rapid, programmable, and non-mechanical alteration of its phase profile by the application of appropriate voltages to its transparent electrodes.The goal of this dissertation is twofold: (1) to integrate a liquid crystal spatial light modulator into a CTIS instrument and characterize its performance as a tunable CTIS disperser, and (2) to implement tunability by analyzing different CTIS configurations.The theoretical model of CTIS operation, calibration, reconstruction, and disperser design are covered in detail. The cross talk of the LC SLM forces the use of a feedback design algorithm rather than designing the desired phase profile a priori in the computer. The modifications to the current polychromatic linear inversion technique for use with the LC SLM in feedback are presented. The result of the modifications is the successful integration of a reprogrammable (i.e. tunable) disperser for the CTIS instrument.The implementation of tunability is explored by analyzing the spectral resolution of a reconstructed point source for different disperser configurations. A method for experimentally determining the CTIS spectral resolution is presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectimaging spectrometeren_US
dc.subjectcomputer generated hologramen_US
dc.subjectliquid crystal spatial light modulatoren_US
dc.subjectoptical phased arrayen_US
dc.subjectcomputed tomographic imaging spectrometeren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDallas, Willliam J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHege, E. Keithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1023en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137353547en_US
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