IR Sensitive Photorefractive Polymers, The First Updateable Holographic 3D Display

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194934
Title:
IR Sensitive Photorefractive Polymers, The First Updateable Holographic 3D Display
Author:
Tay, Savas
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This work presents recent advances in the development of infra-red sensitive photorefractive polymers, and updateable near real-time holographic 3D displays based on photorefractive polymers. Theoretical and experimental techniques used for design, fabrication and characterization of photorefractive polymers are outlined. Materials development and technical advances that made possible the use of photorefractive polymers for infra-red free-space optical communications, and 3D holographic displays are presented.Photorefractive polymers are dynamic holographic materials that allow recording of highly efficient reversible holograms. The longest operation wavelength for a photorefractive polymer before this study has been 950nm, far shorter than 1550nm, the wavelength of choice for optical communications and medical imaging. The polymers shown here were sensitized using two-photon absorption, a third order nonlinear effect, beyond the linear absorption spectrum of organic dyes, and reach 40% diffraction efficiency with a 35ms response time at this wavelength. As a consequence of two-photon absorption sensitization they exhibit non-destructive readout, which is an important advantage for applications that require high signal-to-noise ratios.Holographic 3D displays provide highly realistic images without the need for special eyewear, making them valuable tools for applications that require "situational awareness" such as medical, industrial and military imaging. Current commercially available holographic 3D displays employ photopolymers that lack image updating capability, resulting in their restricted use and high cost per 3D image. The holographic 3D display shown here employs photorefractive polymers with nearly 100% diffraction efficiency and fast writing time, hours of image persistence, rapid erasure and large area, a combination of properties that has not been shown before. The 3D display is based on stereography and utilizes world's largest photorefractive devices (4x4 inch in size). It can be recorded within a few minutes, viewed for several hours without the need for refreshing and can be completely erased and updated with new images when desired, thusly comprising the first updateable holographic 3D display with memory, suitable for practical use.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
photorefractive polymer; two-photon absorption; holographic display; 3D; stereography; holography
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peyghambarian, Nasser
Committee Chair:
Peyghambarian, Nasser

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleIR Sensitive Photorefractive Polymers, The First Updateable Holographic 3D Displayen_US
dc.creatorTay, Savasen_US
dc.contributor.authorTay, Savasen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work presents recent advances in the development of infra-red sensitive photorefractive polymers, and updateable near real-time holographic 3D displays based on photorefractive polymers. Theoretical and experimental techniques used for design, fabrication and characterization of photorefractive polymers are outlined. Materials development and technical advances that made possible the use of photorefractive polymers for infra-red free-space optical communications, and 3D holographic displays are presented.Photorefractive polymers are dynamic holographic materials that allow recording of highly efficient reversible holograms. The longest operation wavelength for a photorefractive polymer before this study has been 950nm, far shorter than 1550nm, the wavelength of choice for optical communications and medical imaging. The polymers shown here were sensitized using two-photon absorption, a third order nonlinear effect, beyond the linear absorption spectrum of organic dyes, and reach 40% diffraction efficiency with a 35ms response time at this wavelength. As a consequence of two-photon absorption sensitization they exhibit non-destructive readout, which is an important advantage for applications that require high signal-to-noise ratios.Holographic 3D displays provide highly realistic images without the need for special eyewear, making them valuable tools for applications that require "situational awareness" such as medical, industrial and military imaging. Current commercially available holographic 3D displays employ photopolymers that lack image updating capability, resulting in their restricted use and high cost per 3D image. The holographic 3D display shown here employs photorefractive polymers with nearly 100% diffraction efficiency and fast writing time, hours of image persistence, rapid erasure and large area, a combination of properties that has not been shown before. The 3D display is based on stereography and utilizes world's largest photorefractive devices (4x4 inch in size). It can be recorded within a few minutes, viewed for several hours without the need for refreshing and can be completely erased and updated with new images when desired, thusly comprising the first updateable holographic 3D display with memory, suitable for practical use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectphotorefractive polymeren_US
dc.subjecttwo-photon absorptionen_US
dc.subjectholographic displayen_US
dc.subject3Den_US
dc.subjectstereographyen_US
dc.subjectholographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeyghambarian, Nasseren_US
dc.contributor.chairPeyghambarian, Nasseren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPau, Stanleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorwood, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2421en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748327en_US
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