The Influence of Phylogenetic and Functional Similarity on Species Coexistence Through Space and Time

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194918
Title:
The Influence of Phylogenetic and Functional Similarity on Species Coexistence Through Space and Time
Author:
Swenson, Nathan Garrick
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The problem of species diversity and co-existence in hyper-diverse communities remains. Traditionally ecologists have approached this problem from examining patterns of co-occurrence, interaction matrices and abundance distributions. This work, while productive, generally has rarely explored the role of shared ancestry and species-specific quantitative function in promoting species diversity and co-existence. This has been a critical oversight as simply analyzing the list of Latin binomials in an assemblage ignores the relatedness between taxa as well as the diversity in organismal form and function--the very information relevant to evolutionary, ecological, and historical hypotheses about the distribution of diversity and community assembly. The following research is designed to investigate the role of phylogenetic and functional similarity on species diversity and co-existence through space and time in diverse tropical tree communities. Specifically, I investigate: (i) the role of phylogenetic relatedness in determining community structure from very local to large regional spatial scales; (ii) the role of phylogeny in determining the structure of tree communities at different strategraphic levels in the canopy; (iii) the power of recently developed phylogenetic analyses to detect non-random patterns of co-existence in communities when the phylogenetic tree used is not completely resolved; (iv) the role of functional similarity in promoting co-existence in a Neotropical dry forest through space and across body sizes; (v) whether decadal long trends in forest composition can be explained on the basis of species-specific function; and (vi) variability in a key functional trait across New World forest communities and along the Angiosperm phylogeny.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enquist, Brian J.
Committee Chair:
Enquist, Brian J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Phylogenetic and Functional Similarity on Species Coexistence Through Space and Timeen_US
dc.creatorSwenson, Nathan Garricken_US
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Nathan Garricken_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe problem of species diversity and co-existence in hyper-diverse communities remains. Traditionally ecologists have approached this problem from examining patterns of co-occurrence, interaction matrices and abundance distributions. This work, while productive, generally has rarely explored the role of shared ancestry and species-specific quantitative function in promoting species diversity and co-existence. This has been a critical oversight as simply analyzing the list of Latin binomials in an assemblage ignores the relatedness between taxa as well as the diversity in organismal form and function--the very information relevant to evolutionary, ecological, and historical hypotheses about the distribution of diversity and community assembly. The following research is designed to investigate the role of phylogenetic and functional similarity on species diversity and co-existence through space and time in diverse tropical tree communities. Specifically, I investigate: (i) the role of phylogenetic relatedness in determining community structure from very local to large regional spatial scales; (ii) the role of phylogeny in determining the structure of tree communities at different strategraphic levels in the canopy; (iii) the power of recently developed phylogenetic analyses to detect non-random patterns of co-existence in communities when the phylogenetic tree used is not completely resolved; (iv) the role of functional similarity in promoting co-existence in a Neotropical dry forest through space and across body sizes; (v) whether decadal long trends in forest composition can be explained on the basis of species-specific function; and (vi) variability in a key functional trait across New World forest communities and along the Angiosperm phylogeny.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBreshears, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuxman, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanderson, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVenable, D. Larryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2782en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749818en_US
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