Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Metal-Containing Transient Molecules

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194897
Title:
Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Metal-Containing Transient Molecules
Author:
Sun, Ming
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Simple organometallic molecules, especially those with a single ligand, are the desired model systems to investigate the metal-ligand interactions. For such a molecule, a quantitative relationship between the geometry and the electronic configuration would be instructive to test the existing theories and to access more complicated systems as well. As a matter of fact, microwave spectroscopy could be the best approach to address this issue by measuring the pure rotational spectrum of a metal-containing molecule. By doing so, microwave spectroscopy can provide the most reliable bond lengths and bond angles for the molecule based on the rotational constants of a set of isotopologues. On the other hand, from the fine-structure and hyperfine-structure of the spectrum, microwave spectroscopy can also describe the electronic manifold, charge distribution and bonding nature of the molecule in a quantitative way.Fourier transform microwave spectrometers have been the most popular equipment to measure the pure rotational spectrum for three decades owing to the high resolution and super sensitivity. With the advances in digital electronics and the molecular production techniques, hyperfine structures of metal-containing molecules can be easily resolved even for the rare isotopologues in their nature abundance by this type of spectrometers.In this dissertation, molecules bearing metals in a wide range covering both the main group and transition metals were studied. By taking advantage of both the traditional and newly developed molecular production techniques in the gas phase (for example, metal pin-electrodes and discharged assisted laser ablation spectroscopy), we obtained spectra of molecules containing magnesium, aluminum, arsenic, copper and zinc. Our subjects include metal acetylides (MgCCH, AlCCH and CuCCH), metal dicarbides (CCAs), metal cyanides (CuCN, ZnCN) as well as other metal mono-ligand molecules. For the zinc metal, complexes with two simple ligands were also investigated, such as HZnCl and HZnCN. We strongly believe that researchers in different disciplines would benefit from our laboratory studies: theoretical chemists can use our experimental results for calibration; astrophysicists would interpret their telescope observations by matching our precisely measured frequencies; material scientists could find new functional materials by linking the bulky properties of certain materials with our spectroscopic results of the monomers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Fourier Transform Microwave; FTMW; Metal-Containing Molecule; Rotational Spectroscopy; Spectroscopy; Transient Molecule
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ziurys, Lucy M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Metal-Containing Transient Moleculesen_US
dc.creatorSun, Mingen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Mingen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSimple organometallic molecules, especially those with a single ligand, are the desired model systems to investigate the metal-ligand interactions. For such a molecule, a quantitative relationship between the geometry and the electronic configuration would be instructive to test the existing theories and to access more complicated systems as well. As a matter of fact, microwave spectroscopy could be the best approach to address this issue by measuring the pure rotational spectrum of a metal-containing molecule. By doing so, microwave spectroscopy can provide the most reliable bond lengths and bond angles for the molecule based on the rotational constants of a set of isotopologues. On the other hand, from the fine-structure and hyperfine-structure of the spectrum, microwave spectroscopy can also describe the electronic manifold, charge distribution and bonding nature of the molecule in a quantitative way.Fourier transform microwave spectrometers have been the most popular equipment to measure the pure rotational spectrum for three decades owing to the high resolution and super sensitivity. With the advances in digital electronics and the molecular production techniques, hyperfine structures of metal-containing molecules can be easily resolved even for the rare isotopologues in their nature abundance by this type of spectrometers.In this dissertation, molecules bearing metals in a wide range covering both the main group and transition metals were studied. By taking advantage of both the traditional and newly developed molecular production techniques in the gas phase (for example, metal pin-electrodes and discharged assisted laser ablation spectroscopy), we obtained spectra of molecules containing magnesium, aluminum, arsenic, copper and zinc. Our subjects include metal acetylides (MgCCH, AlCCH and CuCCH), metal dicarbides (CCAs), metal cyanides (CuCN, ZnCN) as well as other metal mono-ligand molecules. For the zinc metal, complexes with two simple ligands were also investigated, such as HZnCl and HZnCN. We strongly believe that researchers in different disciplines would benefit from our laboratory studies: theoretical chemists can use our experimental results for calibration; astrophysicists would interpret their telescope observations by matching our precisely measured frequencies; material scientists could find new functional materials by linking the bulky properties of certain materials with our spectroscopic results of the monomers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectFourier Transform Microwaveen_US
dc.subjectFTMWen_US
dc.subjectMetal-Containing Moleculeen_US
dc.subjectRotational Spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectSpectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectTransient Moleculeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairZiurys, Lucy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZiurys, Lucy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPolt, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMash, Eugeneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanov, Andreien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAdamowicz, Ludwiken_US
dc.identifier.proquest11374en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261239en_US
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