Development of Remote Sensing Techniques for Assessment of Salinity Induced Plant Stresses

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194858
Title:
Development of Remote Sensing Techniques for Assessment of Salinity Induced Plant Stresses
Author:
Stong, Matthew Harold
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Salinity has been shown to reduce vegetative growth, crop quality, and yield in agricultural crops. Remote sensing is capable of providing data about large areas. This project was designed to induce salinity stress in a crop, pak choi, and thereafter monitor the response of the crop as expressed by its spectral reflectances. The project was conducted in the National Taiwan University Phytotron, and spectral data was collected using a GER 2600. Yield and soil salinity (ECe) were also measured. After three seasons of data were collected, wavelengths sensitive to salinity were selected. These wavelengths, which are within the spectral response of biochemicals produced by plants as a response to soil salinity, were used to create two indices, the Salinity Stress Index (SSI) and the Normalized Salinity Stress Index (NSSI). After creating the indices tests were conducted to determine the efficacy of these indices in detecting salinity and drought stresses as compared to existing indices (SRVI and NDVI). This project induced salinity and drought stress in a crop, pak choi, and thereafter monitored the response of the crop as expressed by its spectral reflectances. The SSI and NSSI correlated well to both ECe and marketable yield. Additionally the SSI and NSSI were found to provide statistical differences between salinity stressed treatments and the control treatment. Drought stress was not detected well by any of the indices reviewed although the SSI and NSSI indices tended to increase with drought stress and decrease with salinity stress. As a final test, specific ion toxicities of sodium and chloride were tested against the developed indices (SSI and NSSI) and existing indices (NDVI, SRVI, and NDWI). There were no differences in SSI and NSSI responses to specific ion concentration in the high salinity treatments. These results indicated that the SSI and NSSI are not sensitive to the specific ion concentration in irrigation water. However, the SSI and NSSI were higher for the sodium water than the choride water in the low salinity treatments. It is likely that this difference was caused by the fact that the high SAR water decreased infiltration and caused water stress.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Remote Sensing; Salinity; Soil Salinity; Drought
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waller, Peter
Committee Chair:
Waller, Peter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of Remote Sensing Techniques for Assessment of Salinity Induced Plant Stressesen_US
dc.creatorStong, Matthew Harolden_US
dc.contributor.authorStong, Matthew Harolden_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSalinity has been shown to reduce vegetative growth, crop quality, and yield in agricultural crops. Remote sensing is capable of providing data about large areas. This project was designed to induce salinity stress in a crop, pak choi, and thereafter monitor the response of the crop as expressed by its spectral reflectances. The project was conducted in the National Taiwan University Phytotron, and spectral data was collected using a GER 2600. Yield and soil salinity (ECe) were also measured. After three seasons of data were collected, wavelengths sensitive to salinity were selected. These wavelengths, which are within the spectral response of biochemicals produced by plants as a response to soil salinity, were used to create two indices, the Salinity Stress Index (SSI) and the Normalized Salinity Stress Index (NSSI). After creating the indices tests were conducted to determine the efficacy of these indices in detecting salinity and drought stresses as compared to existing indices (SRVI and NDVI). This project induced salinity and drought stress in a crop, pak choi, and thereafter monitored the response of the crop as expressed by its spectral reflectances. The SSI and NSSI correlated well to both ECe and marketable yield. Additionally the SSI and NSSI were found to provide statistical differences between salinity stressed treatments and the control treatment. Drought stress was not detected well by any of the indices reviewed although the SSI and NSSI indices tended to increase with drought stress and decrease with salinity stress. As a final test, specific ion toxicities of sodium and chloride were tested against the developed indices (SSI and NSSI) and existing indices (NDVI, SRVI, and NDWI). There were no differences in SSI and NSSI responses to specific ion concentration in the high salinity treatments. These results indicated that the SSI and NSSI are not sensitive to the specific ion concentration in irrigation water. However, the SSI and NSSI were higher for the sodium water than the choride water in the low salinity treatments. It is likely that this difference was caused by the fact that the high SAR water decreased infiltration and caused water stress.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectSoil Salinityen_US
dc.subjectDroughten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaller, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.chairWaller, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlack, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin. D. P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWissler, Craigen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2722en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749735en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.