Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194853
Title:
The Causes of Sex Offending
Author:
Stinson, Jill Diane
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Researchers, clinicians, theorists, and policy makers have embraced a variety of etiological explanations in their attempts to understand sexually deviant behaviors. Here, the major etiological models of sex offending are described and analyzed. This discussion includes both single faceted theories - biological, cognitive, behavioral, social learning, personality, and evolutionary theories - as well as multi-faceted or integrated theories - Finkelhor's Precondition Model, Marshall and Barbaree's Integrated Theory, Hall and Hirschman's Quadripartite Model, Malamuth's Confluence Model, and Ward and Siegert's Pathways Model. In addition, a new integrative theory of sexual deviance is introduced. The Multi-Model Self-Regulation Theory includes components of developmental, behavioral, cognitive, and personality research. Relevant empirical findings are presented, and fictional case studies are also provided to demonstrate how this theory would be applied in the explanation of sexual deviance. This work concludes with a discussion of empirical support for the Multi-Modal Self-Regulation Theory as well as future directions for research, prevention, and treatment.In Appendix B, an empirical study of the core components of the Multi-Modal Self-Regulation Theory is included. In this study, dysregulation is examined as a key variable in the development of paraphilias, antisocial behaviors, and disordered substance use in a sample of 95 sex offending men. Results from a causal path analysis demonstrate that dysregulation, as defined by difficulties with emotional regulation, significantly and causally predict both paraphilic and antisocial behaviors. Implications for cognitive and personality variables are also discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
sex offenders; sexual deviance; etiology of sex offending
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Becker, Judith V.; Sales, Bruce D.
Committee Chair:
Becker, Judith V.; Sales, Bruce D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Causes of Sex Offendingen_US
dc.creatorStinson, Jill Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorStinson, Jill Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearchers, clinicians, theorists, and policy makers have embraced a variety of etiological explanations in their attempts to understand sexually deviant behaviors. Here, the major etiological models of sex offending are described and analyzed. This discussion includes both single faceted theories - biological, cognitive, behavioral, social learning, personality, and evolutionary theories - as well as multi-faceted or integrated theories - Finkelhor's Precondition Model, Marshall and Barbaree's Integrated Theory, Hall and Hirschman's Quadripartite Model, Malamuth's Confluence Model, and Ward and Siegert's Pathways Model. In addition, a new integrative theory of sexual deviance is introduced. The Multi-Model Self-Regulation Theory includes components of developmental, behavioral, cognitive, and personality research. Relevant empirical findings are presented, and fictional case studies are also provided to demonstrate how this theory would be applied in the explanation of sexual deviance. This work concludes with a discussion of empirical support for the Multi-Modal Self-Regulation Theory as well as future directions for research, prevention, and treatment.In Appendix B, an empirical study of the core components of the Multi-Modal Self-Regulation Theory is included. In this study, dysregulation is examined as a key variable in the development of paraphilias, antisocial behaviors, and disordered substance use in a sample of 95 sex offending men. Results from a causal path analysis demonstrate that dysregulation, as defined by difficulties with emotional regulation, significantly and causally predict both paraphilic and antisocial behaviors. Implications for cognitive and personality variables are also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsex offendersen_US
dc.subjectsexual devianceen_US
dc.subjectetiology of sex offendingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBecker, Judith V.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Bruce D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBecker, Judith V.en_US
dc.contributor.chairSales, Bruce D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeck, Connieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarland, Randallen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1697en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356773en_US
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