Globalization and Human Rights: The Effects of Integration on State Repression in Developing Countries, 1976-2000

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194850
Title:
Globalization and Human Rights: The Effects of Integration on State Repression in Developing Countries, 1976-2000
Author:
Stewart Ingersoll, Robert O
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The process of globalization is the subject of heated debate over its impacts on human and state security. In this dissertation, I address its influences on one area of human security - the protection of personal integrity rights. Two questions motivate this project. First, does the globalization process affect the decision-making process of leaders such that there is an alteration in the likelihood that their populations will fall victim to violent forms of state repression? Second, how can the globalization phenomenon best be systematically examined in order to gain a better, generalizable understanding of its complex dynamics and effects on state and human security?I contend that globalization must be disaggregated into its distinct aspects, at different levels of analysis, in order to uncover the complex and even contradictory impacts that it is having throughout the international political economy. I utilize data on 156 lesser developed countries over the period of 1973-2000 to assess the effects of several sub-facets of globalization at both the levels of individual state and systemic integration upon personal integrity rights, as measured by the Political Terror Scale. In terms of levels of state integration, the increasing scope of interdependence between state and non-state actors magnifies the external pressures that leaders must consider when deciding whether or not to employ repressive measures to quell domestic threats. At the system level, globalization may be viewed as an ordering principle, which is expanding a set of rules that alters the propensity of states to engage in violent forms of coercion.The findings in this dissertation indicate that globalization is expanding, with respect to lesser developed countries. Moreover, it significantly influences the likelihood that individuals within these states will fall victim to state repression. However, the complexity and contradictory nature of these effects substantiates my claim that one must disaggregate the concept into its distinct parts. In this manner, this dissertation provides a significant contribution to extending our knowledge of the determinants of state repression as well as the effects of the globalization process. Additionally, it provides a model from which additional influences of globalization may be studied.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
International Political Economy; Globalization; Human Rights
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dixon, William J
Committee Chair:
Dixon, William J

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGlobalization and Human Rights: The Effects of Integration on State Repression in Developing Countries, 1976-2000en_US
dc.creatorStewart Ingersoll, Robert Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart Ingersoll, Robert Oen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe process of globalization is the subject of heated debate over its impacts on human and state security. In this dissertation, I address its influences on one area of human security - the protection of personal integrity rights. Two questions motivate this project. First, does the globalization process affect the decision-making process of leaders such that there is an alteration in the likelihood that their populations will fall victim to violent forms of state repression? Second, how can the globalization phenomenon best be systematically examined in order to gain a better, generalizable understanding of its complex dynamics and effects on state and human security?I contend that globalization must be disaggregated into its distinct aspects, at different levels of analysis, in order to uncover the complex and even contradictory impacts that it is having throughout the international political economy. I utilize data on 156 lesser developed countries over the period of 1973-2000 to assess the effects of several sub-facets of globalization at both the levels of individual state and systemic integration upon personal integrity rights, as measured by the Political Terror Scale. In terms of levels of state integration, the increasing scope of interdependence between state and non-state actors magnifies the external pressures that leaders must consider when deciding whether or not to employ repressive measures to quell domestic threats. At the system level, globalization may be viewed as an ordering principle, which is expanding a set of rules that alters the propensity of states to engage in violent forms of coercion.The findings in this dissertation indicate that globalization is expanding, with respect to lesser developed countries. Moreover, it significantly influences the likelihood that individuals within these states will fall victim to state repression. However, the complexity and contradictory nature of these effects substantiates my claim that one must disaggregate the concept into its distinct parts. In this manner, this dissertation provides a significant contribution to extending our knowledge of the determinants of state repression as well as the effects of the globalization process. Additionally, it provides a model from which additional influences of globalization may be studied.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectInternational Political Economyen_US
dc.subjectGlobalizationen_US
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William Jen_US
dc.contributor.chairDixon, William Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoertz, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDesposato, Scott W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1169en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747447en_US
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