Design and Construction of a Multiple Beam Laser Projector and Dynamically Refocused Wavefront Sensor

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194836
Title:
Design and Construction of a Multiple Beam Laser Projector and Dynamically Refocused Wavefront Sensor
Author:
Stalcup, Thomas Eugene
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Adaptive optics using natural guide stars can produce images of amazing quality, but is limited to a small fraction of the sky due to the need for a relatively bright guidestar. Adaptive optics systems using a laser generated artifical reference can be used over a majority of the sky, but these systems have some attendant problems. These problems can be reduced by increasing the altitude of the laser return, and indeed a simple, single laser source focused at an altitude of 95 km on a layer of atmospheric sodium performs well for the current generation of 8-10 m telescopes. For future giant telescopes in the 20-30 m class, however, the errors due to incorrect atmospheric sampling and spot elongation will prohibit such a simple system from working.The system presented in this dissertation provides a solution to these problems. Not only does it provide the 6.5m MMT with a relatively inexpensive laser guide star system with unique capabilities, it allows research into solving many of the problems faced by laser guide star systems on future giant telescopes.The MMT laser guidestar system projects a constellation of five doubled Nd:YAG laser beams focused at a mean height of 25 km, with a dynamic refocus system that corrects for spot elongation and allows integrating the return from a 10 km long range gate. It has produced seeing limited spot sizes in ~1 arcsecond seeing conditions, and has enabled the first on-sky results of Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO).
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
AO; LGS; Laser Guide Star; GLAO; LTAO
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Angel, J. Roger P.
Committee Chair:
Angel, J. Roger P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDesign and Construction of a Multiple Beam Laser Projector and Dynamically Refocused Wavefront Sensoren_US
dc.creatorStalcup, Thomas Eugeneen_US
dc.contributor.authorStalcup, Thomas Eugeneen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdaptive optics using natural guide stars can produce images of amazing quality, but is limited to a small fraction of the sky due to the need for a relatively bright guidestar. Adaptive optics systems using a laser generated artifical reference can be used over a majority of the sky, but these systems have some attendant problems. These problems can be reduced by increasing the altitude of the laser return, and indeed a simple, single laser source focused at an altitude of 95 km on a layer of atmospheric sodium performs well for the current generation of 8-10 m telescopes. For future giant telescopes in the 20-30 m class, however, the errors due to incorrect atmospheric sampling and spot elongation will prohibit such a simple system from working.The system presented in this dissertation provides a solution to these problems. Not only does it provide the 6.5m MMT with a relatively inexpensive laser guide star system with unique capabilities, it allows research into solving many of the problems faced by laser guide star systems on future giant telescopes.The MMT laser guidestar system projects a constellation of five doubled Nd:YAG laser beams focused at a mean height of 25 km, with a dynamic refocus system that corrects for spot elongation and allows integrating the return from a 10 km long range gate. It has produced seeing limited spot sizes in ~1 arcsecond seeing conditions, and has enabled the first on-sky results of Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAOen_US
dc.subjectLGSen_US
dc.subjectLaser Guide Staren_US
dc.subjectGLAOen_US
dc.subjectLTAOen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAngel, J. Roger P.en_US
dc.contributor.chairAngel, J. Roger P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLloyd-Hart, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaisan, Joseen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1764en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746329en_US
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