White, Female Teachers in a Predominantly Hispanic High School: The Journey to Bridge the Cultural Divide

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194801
Title:
White, Female Teachers in a Predominantly Hispanic High School: The Journey to Bridge the Cultural Divide
Author:
Soltero, Crystal Marie
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative study focused on the stories told by five, White, female teachers with a long-term commitment to teach at a predominantly Hispanic high school. The stories of these teachers' life experiences were part of a teaching journey that began long before their formal teacher preparation. Understanding the personal, practical knowledge embedded in the events and experiences of these teachers' journeys was important to study, as these teachers possessed an extremely positive personal and academic reputation with their mostly Hispanic students. This study shed light on possible reasons for these teachers' longetivity in the profession of teaching as well as their ability to bridge cultural differences potentially dividing them from their students.Data collection came from classroom observations, a questionnaire, and a series of three, semi-structured interviews. In a cross-case analysis of the narratives compiled from the data, three main types of stories were told: stories of cross-cultural experiences, difficult challenges, and conversations with students. The highs and lows of these unusual women's experiences provide cases for preservice teachers to consider as they prepare to teach an increasingly diverse student population. These cases also reinforce the importance of cross-cultural experiences and intimate knowledge of challenging issues facing Hispanic communities as a prerequisite both before and throughout teacher preparation programs. These cases also emphasize the importance of conversation as a cultural strategy in bridging the cultural divide with Hispanic students.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Hispanic students; White Teachers; stories of experiences; conversation; cultural divide; relationships
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching & Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Romano-Homoki, Molly
Committee Chair:
Romano-Homoki, Molly

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleWhite, Female Teachers in a Predominantly Hispanic High School: The Journey to Bridge the Cultural Divideen_US
dc.creatorSoltero, Crystal Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoltero, Crystal Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study focused on the stories told by five, White, female teachers with a long-term commitment to teach at a predominantly Hispanic high school. The stories of these teachers' life experiences were part of a teaching journey that began long before their formal teacher preparation. Understanding the personal, practical knowledge embedded in the events and experiences of these teachers' journeys was important to study, as these teachers possessed an extremely positive personal and academic reputation with their mostly Hispanic students. This study shed light on possible reasons for these teachers' longetivity in the profession of teaching as well as their ability to bridge cultural differences potentially dividing them from their students.Data collection came from classroom observations, a questionnaire, and a series of three, semi-structured interviews. In a cross-case analysis of the narratives compiled from the data, three main types of stories were told: stories of cross-cultural experiences, difficult challenges, and conversations with students. The highs and lows of these unusual women's experiences provide cases for preservice teachers to consider as they prepare to teach an increasingly diverse student population. These cases also reinforce the importance of cross-cultural experiences and intimate knowledge of challenging issues facing Hispanic communities as a prerequisite both before and throughout teacher preparation programs. These cases also emphasize the importance of conversation as a cultural strategy in bridging the cultural divide with Hispanic students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHispanic studentsen_US
dc.subjectWhite Teachersen_US
dc.subjectstories of experiencesen_US
dc.subjectconversationen_US
dc.subjectcultural divideen_US
dc.subjectrelationshipsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRomano-Homoki, Mollyen_US
dc.contributor.chairRomano-Homoki, Mollyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2123en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747297en_US
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