Popular Responses to the "Reformation from Without" in the Pays de Vaud

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194793
Title:
Popular Responses to the "Reformation from Without" in the Pays de Vaud
Author:
Blakeley, James Joseph
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines religious reform in the Pays de Vaud, Switzerland from 1526-1537. The author focuses on the reactions of rural common men and women who were forced to abandon their Catholic faith and traditions and accept the Reformation and evangelical pastors. The work demonstrates that many rural folk continued to participate in the rituals and celebrations of the "faith of the fathers" (Catholicism) long after the authorities had mandated the Reformation. The rural folk of the Pays de Vaud confronted religious change in a manner that allowed them to preserve their religious identity. It also reveals that people could act and behave in both Catholic and Reformed way.The dissertation considers how Bern introduced the Reformation in the francophone territories that it controlled. Preaching was the most important vehicle for spreading the new religious teaching. Bern relied on William Farel to give sermons and stir protest throughout the region of Vaud. He left both converts and controversy in his wake. The Bernese religious authorities were short on qualified, francophone pastors, thus they looked outside of Switzerland's borders to recruit men who were willing to preach the Gospel. New pastors were both strangers to the villages in Vaud and socially and economically removed from their rural parishioners. Bern also confiscated church wealth and punished the recalcitrant to implement the Reformation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Switzerland; Vaud; Fribourg; Bern; Reformation; Catholicism
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Karant-Nunn, Susan C.
Committee Chair:
Karant-Nunn, Susan C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePopular Responses to the "Reformation from Without" in the Pays de Vauden_US
dc.creatorBlakeley, James Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlakeley, James Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines religious reform in the Pays de Vaud, Switzerland from 1526-1537. The author focuses on the reactions of rural common men and women who were forced to abandon their Catholic faith and traditions and accept the Reformation and evangelical pastors. The work demonstrates that many rural folk continued to participate in the rituals and celebrations of the "faith of the fathers" (Catholicism) long after the authorities had mandated the Reformation. The rural folk of the Pays de Vaud confronted religious change in a manner that allowed them to preserve their religious identity. It also reveals that people could act and behave in both Catholic and Reformed way.The dissertation considers how Bern introduced the Reformation in the francophone territories that it controlled. Preaching was the most important vehicle for spreading the new religious teaching. Bern relied on William Farel to give sermons and stir protest throughout the region of Vaud. He left both converts and controversy in his wake. The Bernese religious authorities were short on qualified, francophone pastors, thus they looked outside of Switzerland's borders to recruit men who were willing to preach the Gospel. New pastors were both strangers to the villages in Vaud and socially and economically removed from their rural parishioners. Bern also confiscated church wealth and punished the recalcitrant to implement the Reformation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSwitzerlanden_US
dc.subjectVauden_US
dc.subjectFribourgen_US
dc.subjectBernen_US
dc.subjectReformationen_US
dc.subjectCatholicismen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKarant-Nunn, Susan C.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKarant-Nunn, Susan C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNader, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Alan E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1925en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746567en_US
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