A Geopolitics of Intimacy and Anxiety: Religion, Territory, and Fertility in Leh District, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194792
Title:
A Geopolitics of Intimacy and Anxiety: Religion, Territory, and Fertility in Leh District, Jammu and Kashmir, India
Author:
Smith, Sara Hollingsworth
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
What happens when bodies are the territory through which geopolitical strategies play out? In the Leh district of India's contested Jammu and Kashmir State, religious identity has become politicized and Buddhist/Muslim conflict is being articulated at the site of the body. This dissertation contributes to political geography by exploring intimacy and fertility as geopolitical practice. In Leh, political conflict between Buddhists and Muslims is being enacted through women's bodies. Activist members of the Buddhist majority are encouraging Buddhist women to maximize fertility and avoid marrying Muslim men in order to maintain Buddhist electoral control. When women's bodies are instrumentalized and geopolitical strategy seeks to control desire, how do women cope with or resist these pressures? Can the body be an effective site of resistance against the politicization of religion and intimacy? My dissertation research consists of over 200 interviews and surveys of Buddhist and Muslim women in Leh district, as well as a participatory oral history project that engaged students in Leh with these difficult questions. The research explores how the politicization of marriage and fertility is affecting decision-making, how women negotiate religious and political pressures to participate in pro-natal territorial struggles, and how emergent geopolitical religious identities shape visions of the future.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
feminist geography; geopolitics; India; Ladakh; political geography
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marston, Sallie A.
Committee Chair:
Marston, Sallie A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Geopolitics of Intimacy and Anxiety: Religion, Territory, and Fertility in Leh District, Jammu and Kashmir, Indiaen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Sara Hollingsworthen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sara Hollingsworthen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhat happens when bodies are the territory through which geopolitical strategies play out? In the Leh district of India's contested Jammu and Kashmir State, religious identity has become politicized and Buddhist/Muslim conflict is being articulated at the site of the body. This dissertation contributes to political geography by exploring intimacy and fertility as geopolitical practice. In Leh, political conflict between Buddhists and Muslims is being enacted through women's bodies. Activist members of the Buddhist majority are encouraging Buddhist women to maximize fertility and avoid marrying Muslim men in order to maintain Buddhist electoral control. When women's bodies are instrumentalized and geopolitical strategy seeks to control desire, how do women cope with or resist these pressures? Can the body be an effective site of resistance against the politicization of religion and intimacy? My dissertation research consists of over 200 interviews and surveys of Buddhist and Muslim women in Leh district, as well as a participatory oral history project that engaged students in Leh with these difficult questions. The research explores how the politicization of marriage and fertility is affecting decision-making, how women negotiate religious and political pressures to participate in pro-natal territorial struggles, and how emergent geopolitical religious identities shape visions of the future.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectfeminist geographyen_US
dc.subjectgeopoliticsen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.subjectLadakhen_US
dc.subjectpolitical geographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarston, Sallie A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMarston, Sallie A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobbins, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, III, John Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEaton, Richard M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest10417en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752047en_US
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