Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194780
Title:
Tradeoff Studies and Cognitive Biases
Author:
Smith, Eric David
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Decisions among alternatives that do not fit rigorous numerical frameworks are common. Such decisions, in which the various aspects of the alternatives are considered simultaneously, are called a tradeoff studies. Tradeoff studies may be more common than optimization problems, but are not generally formalized in written form.Tradeoff studies are broadly recognized and mandated as the method for considering many criteria simultaneously. They are the primary method for making a decision among alternatives listed in the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR) process.The field of Decision Making can explain why the mechanics of tradeoff studies are approached with underconfidence, and can also help eliminate biases from the tradeoff process. Many conclusions obtained from Judgment and Decision Making (JDM), Cognitive Science and Experimental Economics can be used to shed light on various aspects of the tradeoff process. Of course, since many experiments were designed to reveal truths about choice at a basic level, they do not exactly model the processes of tradeoff studies. The technique used to compare the basic experiments and tradeoff studies will be abstraction.Abstraction noun 1. a general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples, 2. the process of extracting the underlying essence.What follows is a union of the fields of tradeoff studies and cognitive decision making. Because these two areas have never before been explicitly unified, I have produced some unfinished areas in which specific research needs to be done. At this stage, the work of unification must necessarily be conducted at an abstract level.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
tradeoff studies; cognitive biases; rationality; decision making; multicriteria; parallel
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Systems & Industrial Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bahill, Terry
Committee Chair:
Bahill, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTradeoff Studies and Cognitive Biasesen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Eric Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Eric Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDecisions among alternatives that do not fit rigorous numerical frameworks are common. Such decisions, in which the various aspects of the alternatives are considered simultaneously, are called a tradeoff studies. Tradeoff studies may be more common than optimization problems, but are not generally formalized in written form.Tradeoff studies are broadly recognized and mandated as the method for considering many criteria simultaneously. They are the primary method for making a decision among alternatives listed in the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR) process.The field of Decision Making can explain why the mechanics of tradeoff studies are approached with underconfidence, and can also help eliminate biases from the tradeoff process. Many conclusions obtained from Judgment and Decision Making (JDM), Cognitive Science and Experimental Economics can be used to shed light on various aspects of the tradeoff process. Of course, since many experiments were designed to reveal truths about choice at a basic level, they do not exactly model the processes of tradeoff studies. The technique used to compare the basic experiments and tradeoff studies will be abstraction.Abstraction noun 1. a general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples, 2. the process of extracting the underlying essence.What follows is a union of the fields of tradeoff studies and cognitive decision making. Because these two areas have never before been explicitly unified, I have produced some unfinished areas in which specific research needs to be done. At this stage, the work of unification must necessarily be conducted at an abstract level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecttradeoff studiesen_US
dc.subjectcognitive biasesen_US
dc.subjectrationalityen_US
dc.subjectdecision makingen_US
dc.subjectmulticriteriaen_US
dc.subjectparallelen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems & Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBahill, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.chairBahill, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSzidarovszky, Ferencen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSon, Young Junen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPiattelli-Palmarini, Massimoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConnolly, Terryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1589en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356025en_US
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