Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194762
Title:
The Culture of the College Access Profession
Author:
Singer, Nancy Ann
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The overall goal of the research was to deepen our understanding of the culture of college access work through the views of practitioners who design and staff college access programs. This study sought to explore the values, standards, philosophical foundations, career patterns, and networks that influence and guide the work of college access professionals. The study was based primarily upon interviews with twenty college and university professionals who work in the state of Arizona and an analysis of the professional associations in which they participate. The study was modeled after Becher's analysis of the culture of academic disciplines and interview questions fell in the following categories: 1) characteristics of the field, 2) epistemological issues, 3) career patterns, 4) reputations and rewards, 5) professional activity, and 6) value systems. Results indicate that college access professionals tend to describe their work in terms of programs and services to students, family engagement, and developing capacity in the schools. The use of research varies amongst practitioners. The change in the scope of college access work and the growth in the field have also led to the creation of new professional associations. Implications of the study include the need for practioners and professional associations to collaborate, and the need for practitioners to build their knowledge base of the research supporting their work.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
college access; college preparation; college readiness; professional associations; professional culture
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cheslock, John
Committee Chair:
Cheslock, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Culture of the College Access Professionen_US
dc.creatorSinger, Nancy Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorSinger, Nancy Annen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe overall goal of the research was to deepen our understanding of the culture of college access work through the views of practitioners who design and staff college access programs. This study sought to explore the values, standards, philosophical foundations, career patterns, and networks that influence and guide the work of college access professionals. The study was based primarily upon interviews with twenty college and university professionals who work in the state of Arizona and an analysis of the professional associations in which they participate. The study was modeled after Becher's analysis of the culture of academic disciplines and interview questions fell in the following categories: 1) characteristics of the field, 2) epistemological issues, 3) career patterns, 4) reputations and rewards, 5) professional activity, and 6) value systems. Results indicate that college access professionals tend to describe their work in terms of programs and services to students, family engagement, and developing capacity in the schools. The use of research varies amongst practitioners. The change in the scope of college access work and the growth in the field have also led to the creation of new professional associations. Implications of the study include the need for practioners and professional associations to collaborate, and the need for practitioners to build their knowledge base of the research supporting their work.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcollege accessen_US
dc.subjectcollege preparationen_US
dc.subjectcollege readinessen_US
dc.subjectprofessional associationsen_US
dc.subjectprofessional cultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.chairCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10511en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752235en_US
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