Perceived Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Type 2 among Samoans with Metabolic Syndrome

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194748
Title:
Perceived Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Type 2 among Samoans with Metabolic Syndrome
Author:
Siaki, Leilani Ana Cruz Leon Guerrero
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: To explore the relationship between perceived risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and the health-world view of Samoans with two or more components of metabolic syndrome.1. Describe participant's perceptions of risk for CVD and diabetes.2. Compare participants' actual risk of CVD and diabetes based on presence of components of metabolic syndrome to their perceived risk of CVD and diabetes.3. Describe the relationships among participants' health-world views and perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.Rationale/Background: Diabetes and CVD are leading causes of health disparities in the United States, particularly among Pacific Islanders, whose rates for CVD and diabetes are among the highest in the Nation. Metabolic syndrome significantly increases risks for CVD and diabetes and can be prevented using behavioral approaches. An important concept in behavioral models, perceived risk is influenced by both sociocultural and health-world views; yet is understudied in Pacific Islanders with regard to CVD and diabetes.Methods and Sample: Questionnaires and focus groups were used in this mixed methods study involving 43 adult Samoans at moderately high risk of CVD or diabetes. Culture brokers were used to access potential participants using a non-probabilistic sampling scheme. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis respectively, and points of convergence, complementarity, and/or divergence were identified.Results/Significance: Over 80% of participants perceived themselves as high risk for CVD and diabetes. Converging and complementary data revealed predominately accurate perceptions of risk for CVD and diabetes. Underestimations of risk were influenced by current behavior. Overestimations of risk were influenced by behavior, physical health, and family and personal history. Nine codes supported the category health-world view. Five ways of knowing: personal, aesthetic, sociopolitical, empiric, and unknowing, and several values and beliefs i.e. respect, family, religion, harmony/balance, and personal responsibility, together with two cultural codes influenced perceived risk for CVD and diabetes. These important influences on perceived risk for CVD and diabetes in Samoan participants can be used to develop interventions targeting CVD and diabetes, thereby meeting Healthy People 2010, the National Institute of Nursing Research (2006) guidelines, and the National Patient Safety goals (2008) goals.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cardiovascular; Diabetes; Health-world view; Metabolic syndrome; Perceived risk; Samoan; Nursing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Loescher, Lois J
Committee Chair:
Loescher, Lois J

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePerceived Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Type 2 among Samoans with Metabolic Syndromeen_US
dc.creatorSiaki, Leilani Ana Cruz Leon Guerreroen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiaki, Leilani Ana Cruz Leon Guerreroen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: To explore the relationship between perceived risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and the health-world view of Samoans with two or more components of metabolic syndrome.1. Describe participant's perceptions of risk for CVD and diabetes.2. Compare participants' actual risk of CVD and diabetes based on presence of components of metabolic syndrome to their perceived risk of CVD and diabetes.3. Describe the relationships among participants' health-world views and perceived risk for CVD and diabetes.Rationale/Background: Diabetes and CVD are leading causes of health disparities in the United States, particularly among Pacific Islanders, whose rates for CVD and diabetes are among the highest in the Nation. Metabolic syndrome significantly increases risks for CVD and diabetes and can be prevented using behavioral approaches. An important concept in behavioral models, perceived risk is influenced by both sociocultural and health-world views; yet is understudied in Pacific Islanders with regard to CVD and diabetes.Methods and Sample: Questionnaires and focus groups were used in this mixed methods study involving 43 adult Samoans at moderately high risk of CVD or diabetes. Culture brokers were used to access potential participants using a non-probabilistic sampling scheme. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis respectively, and points of convergence, complementarity, and/or divergence were identified.Results/Significance: Over 80% of participants perceived themselves as high risk for CVD and diabetes. Converging and complementary data revealed predominately accurate perceptions of risk for CVD and diabetes. Underestimations of risk were influenced by current behavior. Overestimations of risk were influenced by behavior, physical health, and family and personal history. Nine codes supported the category health-world view. Five ways of knowing: personal, aesthetic, sociopolitical, empiric, and unknowing, and several values and beliefs i.e. respect, family, religion, harmony/balance, and personal responsibility, together with two cultural codes influenced perceived risk for CVD and diabetes. These important influences on perceived risk for CVD and diabetes in Samoan participants can be used to develop interventions targeting CVD and diabetes, thereby meeting Healthy People 2010, the National Institute of Nursing Research (2006) guidelines, and the National Patient Safety goals (2008) goals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascularen_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectHealth-world viewen_US
dc.subjectMetabolic syndromeen_US
dc.subjectPerceived risken_US
dc.subjectSamoanen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLoescher, Lois Jen_US
dc.contributor.chairLoescher, Lois Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslie Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEffken, Judith Aen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10358en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751971en_US
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