Language Dominance And Culture Dominance: L2 Acquisition, L1 Maintenance, And Culture Identification Among Russian Immigrants In The U.S.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194743
Title:
Language Dominance And Culture Dominance: L2 Acquisition, L1 Maintenance, And Culture Identification Among Russian Immigrants In The U.S.
Author:
Shishkin, Elena Markovna
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigated the extent of L2 (English) acquisition and L1 (Russian) maintenance of two age groups of Russian immigrants in the US and examined the relationship between participants' current language dominance and culture dominance. The study also aimed at enhancing theoretical knowledge about the methodology of assessing language and culture dominance and at establishing which of the measures used here (self-reports of language proficiency, three lexical fluency tests, writing tasks, and a culture questionnaire) are the most accurate and practical for determining the more dominant language and culture. In addition to quantitative data, interviews provided insights into the participants' views and opinions on their language and culture and were used to supplement the statistical results with personal comments.The results indicate a surprisingly high level of first language and culture maintenance in the younger group together with highly successful L2 acquisition and acculturation, marking this group as rather balanced bilingually and bi-culturally. The older participants, on the other hand, clearly maintain dominance in both Russian language and Russian culture. Significant correlations established between different language proficiency measures carry methodological importance for future studies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Acculturation; Bilingualism; Culture; Immigrants; Russian
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ecke, Peter
Committee Chair:
Ecke, Peter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLanguage Dominance And Culture Dominance: L2 Acquisition, L1 Maintenance, And Culture Identification Among Russian Immigrants In The U.S.en_US
dc.creatorShishkin, Elena Markovnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShishkin, Elena Markovnaen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigated the extent of L2 (English) acquisition and L1 (Russian) maintenance of two age groups of Russian immigrants in the US and examined the relationship between participants' current language dominance and culture dominance. The study also aimed at enhancing theoretical knowledge about the methodology of assessing language and culture dominance and at establishing which of the measures used here (self-reports of language proficiency, three lexical fluency tests, writing tasks, and a culture questionnaire) are the most accurate and practical for determining the more dominant language and culture. In addition to quantitative data, interviews provided insights into the participants' views and opinions on their language and culture and were used to supplement the statistical results with personal comments.The results indicate a surprisingly high level of first language and culture maintenance in the younger group together with highly successful L2 acquisition and acculturation, marking this group as rather balanced bilingually and bi-culturally. The older participants, on the other hand, clearly maintain dominance in both Russian language and Russian culture. Significant correlations established between different language proficiency measures carry methodological importance for future studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAcculturationen_US
dc.subjectBilingualismen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectImmigrantsen_US
dc.subjectRussianen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEcke, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.chairEcke, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaville-Troike, Murielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNicol, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeafgren, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11157en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261011en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.