Impact of Care-Recipient Resistance During Care Provision on Caregiver Emotional/Physical Well-Being: A Sequential Mixed Method Design with Between- and Within-Person Analyses and Semi-Structured Interviews

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194742
Title:
Impact of Care-Recipient Resistance During Care Provision on Caregiver Emotional/Physical Well-Being: A Sequential Mixed Method Design with Between- and Within-Person Analyses and Semi-Structured Interviews
Author:
Shirai, Yumi
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
To address some remaining questions in the extant family caregiving literature, the present study examined a specific care-recipient (CR) problematic behavior that could be the most critical to family caregiver (CG) emotional and physical well-being--CR-resistance or uncooperative behaviors vis-à-vis the CG. In order to provide detailed descriptions of CR-resistance and to determine the impact of CR-resistance on CG emotional and physical well-being, the present study applied a sequential quantitative-qualitative mixed method design approach with 8-day diary survey data on 63 family CGs and follow-up semi-structured interview data from 19 of those CGs.The quantitative data documented and revealed significant within- and between-person variance in CR-resistance. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) analyses results further revealed that neither the mean level nor the daily fluctuation of CR-resistance across 8 survey days by themselves appeared to have a significant impact on CG emotional or physical health. However, the combination of having relatively high mean level and daily fluctuation of CR-resistance brought had a significant impact on CG physical health; when CGs with relatively high mean level CR-resistance faced more than their usual amount of CR-resistance on a given day, they reported increases in physical health symptoms.The qualitative inductive thematic analyses revealed that based on the context in which CR-resistance occurred and the occurrence patterns, CR-resistance experiences could be divided into four types, and these four types of CR-resistance seem to pose different types and/or magnitude of impact on CG emotional well-being.Furthermore, informed by Social Cognitive Theory and Stress Theory, the present study also examined CG personal, interpersonal, and social resources as possible moderators of the link between CR-resistance and CG emotional/physical well-being. HLM analyses results revealed that CG sense of efficacy, community/professional service utilization, and family disagreement regarding care played significant moderating roles. The qualitative thematic analyses clearly suggested that specific CG cognitive resources--particularly those that were transferred and/or generalized from the CG's past professional or personal experiences--have a strong influence on CG resilience in the face of CR-resistance. The moderating results were interpreted light of theoretical frameworks and extant literature. Implications and future directions are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Caregiver; Daily; Mixed Methods; Qualitative; Resistance; Well-being
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family & Consumer Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koerner, Susan Silverberg
Committee Chair:
Koerner, Susan Silverberg

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImpact of Care-Recipient Resistance During Care Provision on Caregiver Emotional/Physical Well-Being: A Sequential Mixed Method Design with Between- and Within-Person Analyses and Semi-Structured Interviewsen_US
dc.creatorShirai, Yumien_US
dc.contributor.authorShirai, Yumien_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo address some remaining questions in the extant family caregiving literature, the present study examined a specific care-recipient (CR) problematic behavior that could be the most critical to family caregiver (CG) emotional and physical well-being--CR-resistance or uncooperative behaviors vis-à-vis the CG. In order to provide detailed descriptions of CR-resistance and to determine the impact of CR-resistance on CG emotional and physical well-being, the present study applied a sequential quantitative-qualitative mixed method design approach with 8-day diary survey data on 63 family CGs and follow-up semi-structured interview data from 19 of those CGs.The quantitative data documented and revealed significant within- and between-person variance in CR-resistance. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) analyses results further revealed that neither the mean level nor the daily fluctuation of CR-resistance across 8 survey days by themselves appeared to have a significant impact on CG emotional or physical health. However, the combination of having relatively high mean level and daily fluctuation of CR-resistance brought had a significant impact on CG physical health; when CGs with relatively high mean level CR-resistance faced more than their usual amount of CR-resistance on a given day, they reported increases in physical health symptoms.The qualitative inductive thematic analyses revealed that based on the context in which CR-resistance occurred and the occurrence patterns, CR-resistance experiences could be divided into four types, and these four types of CR-resistance seem to pose different types and/or magnitude of impact on CG emotional well-being.Furthermore, informed by Social Cognitive Theory and Stress Theory, the present study also examined CG personal, interpersonal, and social resources as possible moderators of the link between CR-resistance and CG emotional/physical well-being. HLM analyses results revealed that CG sense of efficacy, community/professional service utilization, and family disagreement regarding care played significant moderating roles. The qualitative thematic analyses clearly suggested that specific CG cognitive resources--particularly those that were transferred and/or generalized from the CG's past professional or personal experiences--have a strong influence on CG resilience in the face of CR-resistance. The moderating results were interpreted light of theoretical frameworks and extant literature. Implications and future directions are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCaregiveren_US
dc.subjectDailyen_US
dc.subjectMixed Methodsen_US
dc.subjectQualitativeen_US
dc.subjectResistanceen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKoerner, Susan Silverbergen_US
dc.contributor.chairKoerner, Susan Silverbergen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberButler, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTomasa, Lynneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilhelm, Marien_US
dc.identifier.proquest11415en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261276en_US
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