A Discourse Analysis of Chinese Disagreement Management Strategies in Business Negotiation Settings

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194733
Title:
A Discourse Analysis of Chinese Disagreement Management Strategies in Business Negotiation Settings
Author:
Shen, Lei
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates strategies of native Mandarin Chinese speakers in disagreement management at business negotiation settings by examining linguistic and non-linguistic resources recurrently utilized by the participants in this study. A principal concern is how cultural and contextual factors contribute to the formation and interpretation of the strategies.The present study is intended to provide Western audiences with practical information about Chinese tactics in their disagreement management particularly at business settings. The ultimate goal of this study is to enhance intercultural communication and understanding. Under the guidance of the theoretical and methodological principles of interactional sociolinguistic approaches, I observed and filmed seven live Chinese business negotiation meetings and conducted three post-interviews with key participants at three Chinese cities. The treatment of the data includes transcribing the set of the data, identifying the instances containing the strategies, and analyzing patterned strategies with the qualitative method. In this study, I argue that the preference for agreement is situational specific. The findings indicate Chinese people are conscious of their opponent's face, but business interest outweighs face politeness. The study shows that business interest and power/personal relationships are major factors in the participant's choice of disagreement management strategies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
East Asian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
LIU, FENG-HSI; HILL, JANE H
Committee Chair:
LIU, FENG-HSI; HILL, JANE H

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA Discourse Analysis of Chinese Disagreement Management Strategies in Business Negotiation Settingsen_US
dc.creatorShen, Leien_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Leien_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates strategies of native Mandarin Chinese speakers in disagreement management at business negotiation settings by examining linguistic and non-linguistic resources recurrently utilized by the participants in this study. A principal concern is how cultural and contextual factors contribute to the formation and interpretation of the strategies.The present study is intended to provide Western audiences with practical information about Chinese tactics in their disagreement management particularly at business settings. The ultimate goal of this study is to enhance intercultural communication and understanding. Under the guidance of the theoretical and methodological principles of interactional sociolinguistic approaches, I observed and filmed seven live Chinese business negotiation meetings and conducted three post-interviews with key participants at three Chinese cities. The treatment of the data includes transcribing the set of the data, identifying the instances containing the strategies, and analyzing patterned strategies with the qualitative method. In this study, I argue that the preference for agreement is situational specific. The findings indicate Chinese people are conscious of their opponent's face, but business interest outweighs face politeness. The study shows that business interest and power/personal relationships are major factors in the participant's choice of disagreement management strategies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLIU, FENG-HSIen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHILL, JANE Hen_US
dc.contributor.chairLIU, FENG-HSIen_US
dc.contributor.chairHILL, JANE Hen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaville-Troike, Murielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPao Tao, Chia-linen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1469en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356905en_US
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