Transcribing from Brass Band to Wind Band: A Comparison of Approaches and Methods and Subsequent Transcription of "Gypsy Dream" by Peter Graham

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194731
Title:
Transcribing from Brass Band to Wind Band: A Comparison of Approaches and Methods and Subsequent Transcription of "Gypsy Dream" by Peter Graham
Author:
Shelton, Brian MacDonald
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The brass band and wind band had similar repertoires in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with marches, dances, solos, and transcriptions written prominently for both ensembles. The repertoires diverged at the beginning of the twentieth century as brass band contests commissioned new and original works and international composers began writing serious works for wind band. In the 1970s, British composer Philip Sparke succeeded in writing music for both ensembles and subsequently began to create a shared repertoire, and other composers started contributing to this repertoire. As this repertoire has proliferated, much of it has become worthy of serious study. The purpose of the current study is to find shared scoring tendencies between three transcriptions: one written by the original composer; a second transcribed by a different composer; and a third transcribed by both the original composer and a different composer. The works selected were The Year of the Dragon by Philip Sparke (transcribed by the composer), Variations for Brass Band by Ralph Vaughan Williams (transcribed by Donald Hunsberger), and Call of the Cossacks by Peter Graham (transcribed by the composer and Mick Dowrick). There were several effective instrumentation choices the works shared, including woodwind prominence in solo and lyrical passages, double reeds substituting for small brass ensembles, and high woodwinds written one or more octaves above the original. Adapting these choices, the author created a transcription of Gypsy Dream, the second movement of Call of the Cossacks. Further, these commonalities can serve as guidelines for other transcribers to arrange brass band works for wind band and expand this shared repertoire.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Brass Band; Peter Graham; Philip Sparke; Ralph Vaughan Williams; Transcriptions; Wind Band
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hanson, Gregg I
Committee Chair:
Hanson, Gregg I

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTranscribing from Brass Band to Wind Band: A Comparison of Approaches and Methods and Subsequent Transcription of "Gypsy Dream" by Peter Grahamen_US
dc.creatorShelton, Brian MacDonalden_US
dc.contributor.authorShelton, Brian MacDonalden_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe brass band and wind band had similar repertoires in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with marches, dances, solos, and transcriptions written prominently for both ensembles. The repertoires diverged at the beginning of the twentieth century as brass band contests commissioned new and original works and international composers began writing serious works for wind band. In the 1970s, British composer Philip Sparke succeeded in writing music for both ensembles and subsequently began to create a shared repertoire, and other composers started contributing to this repertoire. As this repertoire has proliferated, much of it has become worthy of serious study. The purpose of the current study is to find shared scoring tendencies between three transcriptions: one written by the original composer; a second transcribed by a different composer; and a third transcribed by both the original composer and a different composer. The works selected were The Year of the Dragon by Philip Sparke (transcribed by the composer), Variations for Brass Band by Ralph Vaughan Williams (transcribed by Donald Hunsberger), and Call of the Cossacks by Peter Graham (transcribed by the composer and Mick Dowrick). There were several effective instrumentation choices the works shared, including woodwind prominence in solo and lyrical passages, double reeds substituting for small brass ensembles, and high woodwinds written one or more octaves above the original. Adapting these choices, the author created a transcription of Gypsy Dream, the second movement of Call of the Cossacks. Further, these commonalities can serve as guidelines for other transcribers to arrange brass band works for wind band and expand this shared repertoire.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBrass Banden_US
dc.subjectPeter Grahamen_US
dc.subjectPhilip Sparkeen_US
dc.subjectRalph Vaughan Williamsen_US
dc.subjectTranscriptionsen_US
dc.subjectWind Banden_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHanson, Gregg Ien_US
dc.contributor.chairHanson, Gregg Ien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRees, Jay Cen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCockrell, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11376en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261240en_US
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