Toward A Sound Methodology for Comparative Rhetoric with Aymara as a Case Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194694
Title:
Toward A Sound Methodology for Comparative Rhetoric with Aymara as a Case Study
Author:
Selder, Dennis William
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Studying rhetoric in non-Western contexts is complicated by rhetoric's sedimented cultural history in the West. Analysis of different approaches in anthropology and the discipline of rhetoric itself show that a multi-pronged approach is necessary to study rhetoric, including analysis of texts in context, consideration of the rhetorical competence of speakers, and careful attention to the power dynamics in a given situation. Using the collection and analysis of Aymara texts as an example of this new approach, this dissertation argues that considering rhetoric as a phenomenon of language use that occurs across genres when competent speakers attempt to achieve social or personal ends through language best helps to capture texts that will yield fruitful rhetorical analyses. It is argued further that the methodology developed in the ethnography of speaking for the analysis of communicative events addresses many of the shortcomings in working with texts in languages other than one's own.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Comparative Rhetoric; Aymara
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Warnock, John P.
Committee Chair:
Warnock, John P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleToward A Sound Methodology for Comparative Rhetoric with Aymara as a Case Studyen_US
dc.creatorSelder, Dennis Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorSelder, Dennis Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudying rhetoric in non-Western contexts is complicated by rhetoric's sedimented cultural history in the West. Analysis of different approaches in anthropology and the discipline of rhetoric itself show that a multi-pronged approach is necessary to study rhetoric, including analysis of texts in context, consideration of the rhetorical competence of speakers, and careful attention to the power dynamics in a given situation. Using the collection and analysis of Aymara texts as an example of this new approach, this dissertation argues that considering rhetoric as a phenomenon of language use that occurs across genres when competent speakers attempt to achieve social or personal ends through language best helps to capture texts that will yield fruitful rhetorical analyses. It is argued further that the methodology developed in the ethnography of speaking for the analysis of communicative events addresses many of the shortcomings in working with texts in languages other than one's own.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComparative Rhetoricen_US
dc.subjectAymaraen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWarnock, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWarnock, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomas P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTroike, Rudolph C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2346en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748262en_US
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