And Consumption For All: The Science Fiction Pulps and the Rhetoric of Technology

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194689
Title:
And Consumption For All: The Science Fiction Pulps and the Rhetoric of Technology
Author:
Scott, Ronald
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation argues that in industrial society technology is not merely an immaterial, abstract set of machines but instead has a rhetoric all its own. This rhetoric of technology consists of myriad elements, ranging from cultural conversations about machines and the engineering principles from which they're derived to class relationships naturalized by industrial structures.In the United States, the rhetoric of technology focuses on individuals, creating cults of personality that embody an otherwise abstract entity. This dissertation asserts that these cults focus on specific components of the process of technological development, represented as inventors, engineers, and hackers.The bulk of the dissertation explores the creation and continuation of these cults in American popular culture. Specifically, it examines how these representations are used in the science fiction pulp magazines, published from 1926-1949. Each cult has a period of ascendancy followed by a lessened importance in the rhetoric of technology, and these ebbs and flows are thoroughly represented in the pulps.Each of these cults has its own chapter, with Chapter 1 focusing on the history and definition of the term 'rhetoric of technology' and Chapter 5 examining ways to teach the rhetoric of technology in the college classroom. Chapter 2 focuses on inventors; Chapter 3 examines engineers; and Chapter 4 traces the beginnings of hackers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
rhetoric of technology; science fiction; popular culture
Degree Name:
AuD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Raval, Suresh
Committee Chair:
Raval, Suresh

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAnd Consumption For All: The Science Fiction Pulps and the Rhetoric of Technologyen_US
dc.creatorScott, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Ronalden_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation argues that in industrial society technology is not merely an immaterial, abstract set of machines but instead has a rhetoric all its own. This rhetoric of technology consists of myriad elements, ranging from cultural conversations about machines and the engineering principles from which they're derived to class relationships naturalized by industrial structures.In the United States, the rhetoric of technology focuses on individuals, creating cults of personality that embody an otherwise abstract entity. This dissertation asserts that these cults focus on specific components of the process of technological development, represented as inventors, engineers, and hackers.The bulk of the dissertation explores the creation and continuation of these cults in American popular culture. Specifically, it examines how these representations are used in the science fiction pulp magazines, published from 1926-1949. Each cult has a period of ascendancy followed by a lessened importance in the rhetoric of technology, and these ebbs and flows are thoroughly represented in the pulps.Each of these cults has its own chapter, with Chapter 1 focusing on the history and definition of the term 'rhetoric of technology' and Chapter 5 examining ways to teach the rhetoric of technology in the college classroom. Chapter 2 focuses on inventors; Chapter 3 examines engineers; and Chapter 4 traces the beginnings of hackers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectrhetoric of technologyen_US
dc.subjectscience fictionen_US
dc.subjectpopular cultureen_US
thesis.degree.nameAuDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.chairRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Kenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1255en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354648en_US
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