Vietnamese Students in Mainstream Composition: An Ethnographic Study of Academic Identities in Generation 1.5 Students Who Cross Over

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194684
Title:
Vietnamese Students in Mainstream Composition: An Ethnographic Study of Academic Identities in Generation 1.5 Students Who Cross Over
Author:
Schwartz, Gwendolyn Gray
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, Gwen Gray Schwartz argues that students exhibit academic identities that do not always match their instructors' expectations for them and assumptions about them, which creates problems when second language writers enter mainstream composition classes. Using ethnographic methods, she studied three Vietnamese immigrant students from Generation 1.5 who placed into mainstream composition at a large university in the Southwest and found that while each student struggled in some ways to meet the expectations of mainstream composition, their academic identities and notions of success played a large role in how they engaged in or disassociated from the class activities and assignments. Schwartz analyzed the students' writing, and through extensive conversations with them and their mainstream composition instructors discovered that Generation 1.5 students who cross over into mainstream classes have academic identities that are complicated by their status as cross-over students--they juggle multiple languages, cultures, and school systems, all while writing in English while continuing to learn English. And while mainstream instructors do not know how to meet these students' needs, their numbers are increasing steadily across the country. Schwartz begins by complicating the term "Generation 1.5" and "ESL student" and suggests a new term, "cross-over student," to describe those students in Generation 1.5 who place into mainstream composition. Then she describes the term "academic identity" as a lens through which to examine these students' experiences in mainstream composition and their notions of success, which often are quite different from their mainstream instructors'. After extensive analysis of each student's writing, she offers solutions to the placement dilemma this group presents and provides concrete ways for mainstream instructors to better meet the needs of this student population.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
academic identity; vietnamese; composition; Generation 1.5; Cross-over Students; success
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mountford, Roxanne
Committee Chair:
Mountford, Roxanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleVietnamese Students in Mainstream Composition: An Ethnographic Study of Academic Identities in Generation 1.5 Students Who Cross Overen_US
dc.creatorSchwartz, Gwendolyn Grayen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Gwendolyn Grayen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, Gwen Gray Schwartz argues that students exhibit academic identities that do not always match their instructors' expectations for them and assumptions about them, which creates problems when second language writers enter mainstream composition classes. Using ethnographic methods, she studied three Vietnamese immigrant students from Generation 1.5 who placed into mainstream composition at a large university in the Southwest and found that while each student struggled in some ways to meet the expectations of mainstream composition, their academic identities and notions of success played a large role in how they engaged in or disassociated from the class activities and assignments. Schwartz analyzed the students' writing, and through extensive conversations with them and their mainstream composition instructors discovered that Generation 1.5 students who cross over into mainstream classes have academic identities that are complicated by their status as cross-over students--they juggle multiple languages, cultures, and school systems, all while writing in English while continuing to learn English. And while mainstream instructors do not know how to meet these students' needs, their numbers are increasing steadily across the country. Schwartz begins by complicating the term "Generation 1.5" and "ESL student" and suggests a new term, "cross-over student," to describe those students in Generation 1.5 who place into mainstream composition. Then she describes the term "academic identity" as a lens through which to examine these students' experiences in mainstream composition and their notions of success, which often are quite different from their mainstream instructors'. After extensive analysis of each student's writing, she offers solutions to the placement dilemma this group presents and provides concrete ways for mainstream instructors to better meet the needs of this student population.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectacademic identityen_US
dc.subjectvietnameseen_US
dc.subjectcompositionen_US
dc.subjectGeneration 1.5en_US
dc.subjectCross-over Studentsen_US
dc.subjectsuccessen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMountford, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.chairMountford, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1494en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746264en_US
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