On Imagination and Erasure: Investigating Undergraduate Spanish Language Education in the U.S. Southwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194683
Title:
On Imagination and Erasure: Investigating Undergraduate Spanish Language Education in the U.S. Southwest
Author:
Schwartz, Adam Frederick
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the in-class and out-of-class language learning experiences of university students in the U.S. Southwest enrolled in beginner-level Spanish. Spanish is not only the fastest growing spoken language in the U.S.; it is also the most popular second language studied across educational institutions, by far. My research indicates that students often idealize the Southwest as inherently bilingual and therefore enroll in Spanish to gain access to this bilingualism, although expectations for language learning within the university encourage otherwise. Topic and discourse analyses of course syllabi, textbooks and field notes demonstrate how broad institutional ideologies and daily classroom interactions work to socialize and, in fact, encourage students to ignore the existence and contributions of local Spanish-speaking populations and imagine Spanish as foreign. Interviews, surveys and student journal entries document ongoing informal experiences with Spanish out-of-class. In addition, interviews, surveys and participant observation aim to identify how students "do" Spanish in a college classroom by navigating and managing their language learning experiences. This research is an important first step to understanding the benefits and complexities of framing Spanish as a local, community-based resource and thereby encouraging dialogue and interaction between traditionally disconnected communities of practice: university students and the larger multilingual, multicultural societies in which they live.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Rui­z, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOn Imagination and Erasure: Investigating Undergraduate Spanish Language Education in the U.S. Southwesten_US
dc.creatorSchwartz, Adam Fredericken_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Adam Fredericken_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the in-class and out-of-class language learning experiences of university students in the U.S. Southwest enrolled in beginner-level Spanish. Spanish is not only the fastest growing spoken language in the U.S.; it is also the most popular second language studied across educational institutions, by far. My research indicates that students often idealize the Southwest as inherently bilingual and therefore enroll in Spanish to gain access to this bilingualism, although expectations for language learning within the university encourage otherwise. Topic and discourse analyses of course syllabi, textbooks and field notes demonstrate how broad institutional ideologies and daily classroom interactions work to socialize and, in fact, encourage students to ignore the existence and contributions of local Spanish-speaking populations and imagine Spanish as foreign. Interviews, surveys and student journal entries document ongoing informal experiences with Spanish out-of-class. In addition, interviews, surveys and participant observation aim to identify how students "do" Spanish in a college classroom by navigating and managing their language learning experiences. This research is an important first step to understanding the benefits and complexities of framing Spanish as a local, community-based resource and thereby encouraging dialogue and interaction between traditionally disconnected communities of practice: university students and the larger multilingual, multicultural societies in which they live.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRui­z, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOtero, Lydia R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Jane H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10274en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750883en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.