The Social Circulation of Media Scripts and Collaborative Meaning-Making in Moroccan and Lebanese Family Discourse

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194677
Title:
The Social Circulation of Media Scripts and Collaborative Meaning-Making in Moroccan and Lebanese Family Discourse
Author:
Schulthies, Becky Lyn
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation tracks the social circulation of media scripts and collaborative meaning-making in urban Moroccan and Lebanese families' domestic conversations as ways in which the social imaginary of a differentiated pan-Arab audience imaginary is performed. Media scripts refer to television input or information circulated through entextualization processes, embedded direct and indirect quotations framed by a particular discussion, in household dialogues. They include stories, statistics, historical dates, anecdotal observations, music tunes, quotes, iconic units of language varieties and their attendant identities that Moroccan and Lebanese families managed in interpretive discussions. Scripts are easily detached and mobile sound bites that serve on an affective level as possible identity performances. I argue that Fassi Moroccan and Beiruti families are interpretive communities created and who participate in creating a culture of circulation, which is not just about the objects moving through a culture, but the means, methods, and mechanisms of transmission and interpretation built around and negotiated by the members of that community (Lee and LiPuma 2002). Collaborative in this dissertation draws on the Bakhtinian concept that all interaction involves interlocutors, whether present or not, and a set of interpretive conditions affecting meaning (Bakhtin and Holquist 1982:424). Although the social imaginary of an Arab audience is perceived as unitary enough to merit regional satellite programming, the performances of Moroccan and Lebanese families illuminate the differentiated and fractured construction of a pan-Arab cultural project. Through domestic media ethnography of pan-Arab and national entertainment, talk shows, and news programming reception, I explore functional literacies tied to intervisual cues and the management of intergenerational authority; a pan-Arab language ideology that includes performances of multilingualism and shifting identity alignments linked to specific features of linguistic varieties encountered via television; and the link between language, gender, and confessionalism in morality evaluations of gendered media representations. I focus on the everyday domestic contexts, linguistic mechanisms, and discursive frameworks activated by Moroccan and Lebanese families in media engagements.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cultural Circulation; Family; Language Ideology; Lebanon; Media; Morocco
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mendoza-Denton, Norma
Committee Chair:
Mendoza-Denton, Norma

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Social Circulation of Media Scripts and Collaborative Meaning-Making in Moroccan and Lebanese Family Discourseen_US
dc.creatorSchulthies, Becky Lynen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchulthies, Becky Lynen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation tracks the social circulation of media scripts and collaborative meaning-making in urban Moroccan and Lebanese families' domestic conversations as ways in which the social imaginary of a differentiated pan-Arab audience imaginary is performed. Media scripts refer to television input or information circulated through entextualization processes, embedded direct and indirect quotations framed by a particular discussion, in household dialogues. They include stories, statistics, historical dates, anecdotal observations, music tunes, quotes, iconic units of language varieties and their attendant identities that Moroccan and Lebanese families managed in interpretive discussions. Scripts are easily detached and mobile sound bites that serve on an affective level as possible identity performances. I argue that Fassi Moroccan and Beiruti families are interpretive communities created and who participate in creating a culture of circulation, which is not just about the objects moving through a culture, but the means, methods, and mechanisms of transmission and interpretation built around and negotiated by the members of that community (Lee and LiPuma 2002). Collaborative in this dissertation draws on the Bakhtinian concept that all interaction involves interlocutors, whether present or not, and a set of interpretive conditions affecting meaning (Bakhtin and Holquist 1982:424). Although the social imaginary of an Arab audience is perceived as unitary enough to merit regional satellite programming, the performances of Moroccan and Lebanese families illuminate the differentiated and fractured construction of a pan-Arab cultural project. Through domestic media ethnography of pan-Arab and national entertainment, talk shows, and news programming reception, I explore functional literacies tied to intervisual cues and the management of intergenerational authority; a pan-Arab language ideology that includes performances of multilingualism and shifting identity alignments linked to specific features of linguistic varieties encountered via television; and the link between language, gender, and confessionalism in morality evaluations of gendered media representations. I focus on the everyday domestic contexts, linguistic mechanisms, and discursive frameworks activated by Moroccan and Lebanese families in media engagements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCultural Circulationen_US
dc.subjectFamilyen_US
dc.subjectLanguage Ideologyen_US
dc.subjectLebanonen_US
dc.subjectMediaen_US
dc.subjectMoroccoen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPark, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10786en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753631en_US
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