The Influence of the Principal's Leadership Style on Teachers' Use of Technology in the Instruction of Secondary Mathematics and English

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194676
Title:
The Influence of the Principal's Leadership Style on Teachers' Use of Technology in the Instruction of Secondary Mathematics and English
Author:
Schulter, Daniel Joseph
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study sought to advance knowledge between leadership style and teacher's use of technology. This quantitative research study investigated the relationship between principal leadership style determined by the MLQ (Bass & Avolio, 1989) and the perceived Role Messages (Katz & Kahn, 1978) teachers' receive about the use of technology in English and Mathematics. The Role Messages teachers receive from the principal influence the teachers' use of technology. A qualitative instrument, The Role Message Perception Interview for Administrator (RMPI-A) was used to confirm principal's leadership style in the transformation, transactional, and passive/avoidant areas.A transformational leader builds trust, inspires teachers, acts with integrity, encourages innovative thinking, and coaches people to move the teachers to a higher level of commitment. A transactional leader is more concerned with monitoring for mistakes and rewarding achievement. A passive/avoidant leader chooses to use his time dealing with crises and avoids involvement (Bass & Avolio, 1994). Sixty-three teachers of Mathematics and English at each of the five urban high schools responded to the Perceived Role Message Survey for Teachers (RMPS-T), a 56-question survey about the use of technology. The principal's leadership style was compared to their teachers' perception among the five high schools. The responses by teachers on the RMPS-T for the transformational sub-section showed significant differences among teacher responses on school culture (p = 0.0159), there were no other significant differences among transformational sub-sections. On the transactional sub-section showed significant differences among teacher responses on evaluator monitors (p = 0.122), and differences among the my principal rewards me sub-section, but not significant (p = 0.009). On the passive/avoidant the sub-section there were no significant differences.The study sought to show connection between teachers' gender, age, subject taught, the number of college credits earned, and the number of hours of professional development when compared to the number of uses of technology. The findings showed a difference among teacher responses based on gender, but not significant. There were no other significant differences. The results will assist high school principals in understanding how leadership style can impact the use of technology.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Educational Leadership; Technology; Teacher Training; Transformational Leadership; Transactional Leadership
Degree Name:
EdD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Leadership; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hendricks, John Robert
Committee Chair:
Hendricks, John Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of the Principal's Leadership Style on Teachers' Use of Technology in the Instruction of Secondary Mathematics and Englishen_US
dc.creatorSchulter, Daniel Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchulter, Daniel Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study sought to advance knowledge between leadership style and teacher's use of technology. This quantitative research study investigated the relationship between principal leadership style determined by the MLQ (Bass & Avolio, 1989) and the perceived Role Messages (Katz & Kahn, 1978) teachers' receive about the use of technology in English and Mathematics. The Role Messages teachers receive from the principal influence the teachers' use of technology. A qualitative instrument, The Role Message Perception Interview for Administrator (RMPI-A) was used to confirm principal's leadership style in the transformation, transactional, and passive/avoidant areas.A transformational leader builds trust, inspires teachers, acts with integrity, encourages innovative thinking, and coaches people to move the teachers to a higher level of commitment. A transactional leader is more concerned with monitoring for mistakes and rewarding achievement. A passive/avoidant leader chooses to use his time dealing with crises and avoids involvement (Bass & Avolio, 1994). Sixty-three teachers of Mathematics and English at each of the five urban high schools responded to the Perceived Role Message Survey for Teachers (RMPS-T), a 56-question survey about the use of technology. The principal's leadership style was compared to their teachers' perception among the five high schools. The responses by teachers on the RMPS-T for the transformational sub-section showed significant differences among teacher responses on school culture (p = 0.0159), there were no other significant differences among transformational sub-sections. On the transactional sub-section showed significant differences among teacher responses on evaluator monitors (p = 0.122), and differences among the my principal rewards me sub-section, but not significant (p = 0.009). On the passive/avoidant the sub-section there were no significant differences.The study sought to show connection between teachers' gender, age, subject taught, the number of college credits earned, and the number of hours of professional development when compared to the number of uses of technology. The findings showed a difference among teacher responses based on gender, but not significant. There were no other significant differences. The results will assist high school principals in understanding how leadership style can impact the use of technology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectTeacher Trainingen_US
dc.subjectTransformational Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectTransactional Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.nameEdDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHendricks, John Roberten_US
dc.contributor.chairHendricks, John Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcLean, Wadeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1889en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746448en_US
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