Classifying Violent versus Non-Violent Offending in a Diverse Sample of Adolescent Juvenile Delinquents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194671
Title:
Classifying Violent versus Non-Violent Offending in a Diverse Sample of Adolescent Juvenile Delinquents
Author:
Schoenfield, Gretchen
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to examine whether a set of theoretically and empirically established risk factors could contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offending in an ethnically diverse sample of male and female adolescent juvenile delinquents. Variables examined included economic disadvantage, grade point average (GPA), sex, dependency involvement, special education diagnosis, specific learning disability diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, history of illegal substance violation, and recidivism. Observed versus expected frequencies of violent versus non-violent offending across different ethnicity categories were also examined. It was hypothesized that economic disadvantage and grade point average would not significantly contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offense group membership in juvenile delinquents. It was hypothesized that sex, dependency involvement, special education diagnosis, specific learning disability diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, history of illegal substance violation, and recidivism would significantly contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offense group membership in juvenile delinquents. It was also hypothesized that there would be no significant differences between observed versus expected frequency of violent versus non-violent offending across ethnicity categories.A discriminant analysis retained five of nine variables in the final stepwise model, including recidivism, illegal substance violation history, special education diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, and specific learning disability diagnosis. While variables in the analysis significantly contributed to the classification of non-violent group membership, the model yielded low hit ratio for classification of cases into the violent group. A chi-square analysis was also conducted to examine whether there were significant differences between observed and expected frequencies across different ethnicity categories with regard to violent versus non-violent offense group membership. No significant association existed between ethnicity and the juvenile delinquents' expected versus observed frequency of violent versus non-violent offender group membership. Implications of these findings, limitations of the study, and areas for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Juvenile delinquency; Violence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
School Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morris, Richard J.
Committee Chair:
Morris, Richard J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleClassifying Violent versus Non-Violent Offending in a Diverse Sample of Adolescent Juvenile Delinquentsen_US
dc.creatorSchoenfield, Gretchenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchoenfield, Gretchenen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to examine whether a set of theoretically and empirically established risk factors could contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offending in an ethnically diverse sample of male and female adolescent juvenile delinquents. Variables examined included economic disadvantage, grade point average (GPA), sex, dependency involvement, special education diagnosis, specific learning disability diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, history of illegal substance violation, and recidivism. Observed versus expected frequencies of violent versus non-violent offending across different ethnicity categories were also examined. It was hypothesized that economic disadvantage and grade point average would not significantly contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offense group membership in juvenile delinquents. It was hypothesized that sex, dependency involvement, special education diagnosis, specific learning disability diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, history of illegal substance violation, and recidivism would significantly contribute to the classification of violent versus non-violent offense group membership in juvenile delinquents. It was also hypothesized that there would be no significant differences between observed versus expected frequency of violent versus non-violent offending across ethnicity categories.A discriminant analysis retained five of nine variables in the final stepwise model, including recidivism, illegal substance violation history, special education diagnosis, emotional disability diagnosis, and specific learning disability diagnosis. While variables in the analysis significantly contributed to the classification of non-violent group membership, the model yielded low hit ratio for classification of cases into the violent group. A chi-square analysis was also conducted to examine whether there were significant differences between observed and expected frequencies across different ethnicity categories with regard to violent versus non-violent offense group membership. No significant association existed between ethnicity and the juvenile delinquents' expected versus observed frequency of violent versus non-violent offender group membership. Implications of these findings, limitations of the study, and areas for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquencyen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMorris, Richard J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMather, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPerfect, Michelleen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11266en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261106en_US
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