Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194669
Title:
Spouse Factors in Phase-II Cardiac Rehabilitation
Author:
Schoenfeld, Joshua
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research suggests that spouse factors contribute to the course and outcomes of cardiac illness. The present study examined spouse confidence in patient efficacy, spouse psychological distress, and spouse involvement in the research project as predictors of patient participation in Phase-II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and subsequent changes in patient health and weekly exercise in a sample of 128 cardiac patients. Spouse confidence in patient efficacy predicted the number of CR sessions attended by male patients, independent of patients' own self-efficacy ratings, and spouse psychological distress predicted CR program completion among female patients, independent of patients' own distress. Spouse confidence also independently predicted increases in male and female patients' weekly exercise at six-month follow-up. Patients whose spouses participated in the study attended more CR exercise sessions and were more likely to complete the CR program than patients whose spouses did not take part in the study. Spouse involvement in the study also predicted positive health change at six-month follow-up among female patients. Results provide preliminary evidence that spouse factors can have predictive utility in the context of Phase-II CR, and contribute to research on the behavioral pathways via which psychosocial factors are linked to cardiac health outcomes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cardiac; Partner; Spouse
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda
Committee Chair:
Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSpouse Factors in Phase-II Cardiac Rehabilitationen_US
dc.creatorSchoenfeld, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchoenfeld, Joshuaen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research suggests that spouse factors contribute to the course and outcomes of cardiac illness. The present study examined spouse confidence in patient efficacy, spouse psychological distress, and spouse involvement in the research project as predictors of patient participation in Phase-II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and subsequent changes in patient health and weekly exercise in a sample of 128 cardiac patients. Spouse confidence in patient efficacy predicted the number of CR sessions attended by male patients, independent of patients' own self-efficacy ratings, and spouse psychological distress predicted CR program completion among female patients, independent of patients' own distress. Spouse confidence also independently predicted increases in male and female patients' weekly exercise at six-month follow-up. Patients whose spouses participated in the study attended more CR exercise sessions and were more likely to complete the CR program than patients whose spouses did not take part in the study. Spouse involvement in the study also predicted positive health change at six-month follow-up among female patients. Results provide preliminary evidence that spouse factors can have predictive utility in the context of Phase-II CR, and contribute to research on the behavioral pathways via which psychosocial factors are linked to cardiac health outcomes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCardiacen_US
dc.subjectPartneren_US
dc.subjectSpouseen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRohrbaugh, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRohrbaugh, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.chairShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10039en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749981en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.