Teacher Variations When Administering Math Graphics Items to Students With Visual Impairments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194668
Title:
Teacher Variations When Administering Math Graphics Items to Students With Visual Impairments
Author:
Schoch, Christina Sigrid
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This exploratory study investigated the techniques used by teachers of the visually impaired when administering math questions with graphics to students with blindness or low vision. The researcher observed and videotaped 10 pairs of students with visual impairments and their teachers while the students were taking a test that consisted of 12 graphic math items and found a wide variance existed between teachers in the administering of mathematical test items with graphics to their students. The most prevalent teacher behaviors observed were teacher initiation and graph detail description. For the majority of the teacher initiated responses, teachers gave information on a specific detail of the math graphic. Students predominantly asked for clarification regarding the math graphic itself or clarification of the math problem itself. Teachers used a variety of factors in determining if and when students required assistance during testing for large print or tactile graphics. No statistical significance was found between braille and large print groups with regard to teacher variation, student variation, and scores on test items, No relationship was found between correct answers on the test and teacher variation scores but a strong, positive correlation existed for total test time and teacher variation scores. In addition, there was no statistical significance, between the six math graph types used in this study. Hand movements of braille students were also observed, 90% of students using either both hands or mostly both hands when exploring the tactile graphic math problem. A horizontal movement was the primary direction students used when examining the tactile graphic. Recommendations were made regarding future research with large print and tactile graphics
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Accommodations; Assessment; math graphics; verbal description; Visual Impairment
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Erin, Jane N.
Committee Chair:
Erin, Jane N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeacher Variations When Administering Math Graphics Items to Students With Visual Impairmentsen_US
dc.creatorSchoch, Christina Sigriden_US
dc.contributor.authorSchoch, Christina Sigriden_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis exploratory study investigated the techniques used by teachers of the visually impaired when administering math questions with graphics to students with blindness or low vision. The researcher observed and videotaped 10 pairs of students with visual impairments and their teachers while the students were taking a test that consisted of 12 graphic math items and found a wide variance existed between teachers in the administering of mathematical test items with graphics to their students. The most prevalent teacher behaviors observed were teacher initiation and graph detail description. For the majority of the teacher initiated responses, teachers gave information on a specific detail of the math graphic. Students predominantly asked for clarification regarding the math graphic itself or clarification of the math problem itself. Teachers used a variety of factors in determining if and when students required assistance during testing for large print or tactile graphics. No statistical significance was found between braille and large print groups with regard to teacher variation, student variation, and scores on test items, No relationship was found between correct answers on the test and teacher variation scores but a strong, positive correlation existed for total test time and teacher variation scores. In addition, there was no statistical significance, between the six math graph types used in this study. Hand movements of braille students were also observed, 90% of students using either both hands or mostly both hands when exploring the tactile graphic math problem. A horizontal movement was the primary direction students used when examining the tactile graphic. Recommendations were made regarding future research with large print and tactile graphicsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAccommodationsen_US
dc.subjectAssessmenten_US
dc.subjectmath graphicsen_US
dc.subjectverbal descriptionen_US
dc.subjectVisual Impairmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErin, Jane N.en_US
dc.contributor.chairErin, Jane N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTopor, Ireneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAntia, Shirin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYaden, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest11311en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261159en_US
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