Gender Roles, Socialization and Hierarchy in an Allied Health Profession: Radiography Students Constructs of Self and the Profession

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194664
Title:
Gender Roles, Socialization and Hierarchy in an Allied Health Profession: Radiography Students Constructs of Self and the Profession
Author:
Schmidt, Lisa Frances
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Diagnostic medical imaging has typically been a feminized profession for decades, however, since the early 1990's, has increasingly attracted more men into the field, where now, the gender make up for diagnostic imaging is near parity. Medical imaging is a dynamic field comprised of ever evolving technology and sub-imaging fields, referred to as imaging modalities, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, cardiovascular imaging, and nuclear medicine, to name a few. Diagnostic imaging is now described as where the new "hot" jobs are located, and entrance into the field has continued to grow by more than 11 percent each year. This study is designed, through the interviewing of 39 men and women from two radiography programs located geographically 50 miles from one another, to explore the interest of men entering a feminized field characterized as a "high touch" profession, with occupational characteristics that consist of a broad mix of patient care/technology skills. While there is focus on men entering imaging, exploration of the interests of women entering this highly technical and physically challenging profession is a large part of this study, as radiography is feminized yet does not hold necessarily the occupational characteristics consistent with that of feminized fields. Additionally, this study is designed to determine what male and female perspectives are of the profession, as medical imaging has been characterized as consisting of "subordinates" who work under nurses, doctors and radiologists, occupational characteristics that do not typically attract men.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Radiography; students
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGender Roles, Socialization and Hierarchy in an Allied Health Profession: Radiography Students Constructs of Self and the Professionen_US
dc.creatorSchmidt, Lisa Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Lisa Francesen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDiagnostic medical imaging has typically been a feminized profession for decades, however, since the early 1990's, has increasingly attracted more men into the field, where now, the gender make up for diagnostic imaging is near parity. Medical imaging is a dynamic field comprised of ever evolving technology and sub-imaging fields, referred to as imaging modalities, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, cardiovascular imaging, and nuclear medicine, to name a few. Diagnostic imaging is now described as where the new "hot" jobs are located, and entrance into the field has continued to grow by more than 11 percent each year. This study is designed, through the interviewing of 39 men and women from two radiography programs located geographically 50 miles from one another, to explore the interest of men entering a feminized field characterized as a "high touch" profession, with occupational characteristics that consist of a broad mix of patient care/technology skills. While there is focus on men entering imaging, exploration of the interests of women entering this highly technical and physically challenging profession is a large part of this study, as radiography is feminized yet does not hold necessarily the occupational characteristics consistent with that of feminized fields. Additionally, this study is designed to determine what male and female perspectives are of the profession, as medical imaging has been characterized as consisting of "subordinates" who work under nurses, doctors and radiologists, occupational characteristics that do not typically attract men.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectRadiographyen_US
dc.subjectstudentsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCroissant, Jenniferen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1795en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747559en_US
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