Resource Variation in Social Exchange Networks: the Effects of Duplicability And Transferability on the Use of Power

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194654
Title:
Resource Variation in Social Exchange Networks: the Effects of Duplicability And Transferability on the Use of Power
Author:
Schaefer, David
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation presents a theory explaining how characteristics of the resources exchanged in networks influence the outcomes actors experience. I draw upon social exchange theory and social network research to identify valuable benefits provided by networks and relevant dimensions of resource variation. I identify control benefits and diversity benefits as important outcomes driven by network processes. Control benefits derive from exchanging at a favorable rate; diversity benefits are due to the variety of resources an actor receives through exchange. Both of these outcomes have structural foundations; thus actors' benefits are contingent upon their location in the network. I identify two dimensions of resource variation that alter whether resources can be used in multiple exchanges. Duplicability refers to whether a resource provider retains control of the resource and can use it in a subsequent exchange. Transferability refers to whether a resource recipient can utilize that resource in another exchange. Variation along these dimensions affects the mechanisms that produce benefits, such that the advantage of a position depends upon the type of resource exchanged. Hypotheses generated through this theoretical logic are tested in a laboratory experiment. Results provide strong support for the theory: Across the same network structure, resource variation alone produces fundamentally different distributions of control and diversity benefits. The theory successfully predicts how resource characteristics determine 1) variation in control benefits across relations, 2) ordering of diversity benefits across positions, and 3) the correlation of control and diversity benefits across resource types. Implications of these results for social exchange and social network theories are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
social network; social exchange; resource; power; information
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Molm, Linda D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleResource Variation in Social Exchange Networks: the Effects of Duplicability And Transferability on the Use of Poweren_US
dc.creatorSchaefer, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorSchaefer, Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents a theory explaining how characteristics of the resources exchanged in networks influence the outcomes actors experience. I draw upon social exchange theory and social network research to identify valuable benefits provided by networks and relevant dimensions of resource variation. I identify control benefits and diversity benefits as important outcomes driven by network processes. Control benefits derive from exchanging at a favorable rate; diversity benefits are due to the variety of resources an actor receives through exchange. Both of these outcomes have structural foundations; thus actors' benefits are contingent upon their location in the network. I identify two dimensions of resource variation that alter whether resources can be used in multiple exchanges. Duplicability refers to whether a resource provider retains control of the resource and can use it in a subsequent exchange. Transferability refers to whether a resource recipient can utilize that resource in another exchange. Variation along these dimensions affects the mechanisms that produce benefits, such that the advantage of a position depends upon the type of resource exchanged. Hypotheses generated through this theoretical logic are tested in a laboratory experiment. Results provide strong support for the theory: Across the same network structure, resource variation alone produces fundamentally different distributions of control and diversity benefits. The theory successfully predicts how resource characteristics determine 1) variation in control benefits across relations, 2) ordering of diversity benefits across positions, and 3) the correlation of control and diversity benefits across resource types. Implications of these results for social exchange and social network theories are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsocial networken_US
dc.subjectsocial exchangeen_US
dc.subjectresourceen_US
dc.subjectpoweren_US
dc.subjectinformationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMolm, Linda D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBreiger, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcPherson, Milleren_US
dc.identifier.proquest1484en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746257en_US
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