Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194626
Title:
METAPHOR, COGNITIVE ELABORATION AND PERSUASION
Author:
Sarnoff, Tamar Jill
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Metaphors have long been a subject of interest to philosophers, scholars and researchers. Recent insights into the nature and function of metaphor have spurred new interest in the persuasive effects of metaphor. To date, research on the relation between metaphors and attitudes has produced mixed findings. This paper argues that there are several limitations in previous models and designs and this work attempted to resolve several of them. The rationale for the study is based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of persuasion, which argues that cognitive elaboration is a strong predictor of attitudes. Researchers have posited that metaphors should evoke more cognitive elaboration than literal counterparts. This paper reports the results of a study that tested the relationship between metaphors, cognitive elaboration, and attitudes. Participants were exposed to one of 72 message conditions and responded to a set of psychological and attitude scales. Many of the hypotheses were not supported, including tests of the amount of cognitive effort that subjects reported and results related to attitude change by metaphor type. Results indicated that attitudes were stable across time, which is consistent with the ELM.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
dual process model; metaphor; persuasion; random factor ANOVA
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bonito, Joseph A
Committee Chair:
Bonito, Joseph A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMETAPHOR, COGNITIVE ELABORATION AND PERSUASIONen_US
dc.creatorSarnoff, Tamar Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarnoff, Tamar Jillen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMetaphors have long been a subject of interest to philosophers, scholars and researchers. Recent insights into the nature and function of metaphor have spurred new interest in the persuasive effects of metaphor. To date, research on the relation between metaphors and attitudes has produced mixed findings. This paper argues that there are several limitations in previous models and designs and this work attempted to resolve several of them. The rationale for the study is based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of persuasion, which argues that cognitive elaboration is a strong predictor of attitudes. Researchers have posited that metaphors should evoke more cognitive elaboration than literal counterparts. This paper reports the results of a study that tested the relationship between metaphors, cognitive elaboration, and attitudes. Participants were exposed to one of 72 message conditions and responded to a set of psychological and attitude scales. Many of the hypotheses were not supported, including tests of the amount of cognitive effort that subjects reported and results related to attitude change by metaphor type. Results indicated that attitudes were stable across time, which is consistent with the ELM.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdual process modelen_US
dc.subjectmetaphoren_US
dc.subjectpersuasionen_US
dc.subjectrandom factor ANOVAen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBonito, Joseph Aen_US
dc.contributor.chairBonito, Joseph Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTusing, Kyleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDues, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10696en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753468en_US
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