Characterization of Protozoa Transport and Occurrence of Chlorinated-Ethene Reducer Bacteria in Subsurface Environments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194620
Title:
Characterization of Protozoa Transport and Occurrence of Chlorinated-Ethene Reducer Bacteria in Subsurface Environments
Author:
Santamaria, Johanna
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation contains the results of two different projects. The first one is a study of the transport of protozoa pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Encephalitozoon intestinalis in soils. The aim of this project was to investigate the movement and retention mechanisms of these microorganisms in natural porous media. The work determined that in the case of C. parvum, the retention was primarily produced by straining and in the case of E. intestinalis the main retention mechanism was attachment. The results of C. parvum lysimeter experiment compared to the results from the 7 cm column experiments suggest that retention is proportional to the length of the column. The second study evaluated the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) as a tool to identify dechlorinating bacteria in groundwater contaminated with chloroethenes. The target DNA regions to identify these microorganism were the 16s rDNA specific for dehalococcoides sp. and Desulfuromonas and DNA sequences coding for the reductive dehalogenase enzymes pceA, tceA, bvcA and vcrA. Bacteria able to transform PCE into DCE were detected in all groundwater samples. Bacteria able to transform VC into ethene were found only in one of the samples. This study shows that PCR analysis of 16s rDNA and reductive dehalogenase gene sequences together with microcosm results are useful tools to analyze the populations of reductive dechlorinators and their activity in a given site.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
microbial transport; PCE degradation; chlorinated ethenes; reducer bacteria
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brusseau, Mark L.
Committee Chair:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of Protozoa Transport and Occurrence of Chlorinated-Ethene Reducer Bacteria in Subsurface Environmentsen_US
dc.creatorSantamaria, Johannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSantamaria, Johannaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation contains the results of two different projects. The first one is a study of the transport of protozoa pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Encephalitozoon intestinalis in soils. The aim of this project was to investigate the movement and retention mechanisms of these microorganisms in natural porous media. The work determined that in the case of C. parvum, the retention was primarily produced by straining and in the case of E. intestinalis the main retention mechanism was attachment. The results of C. parvum lysimeter experiment compared to the results from the 7 cm column experiments suggest that retention is proportional to the length of the column. The second study evaluated the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) as a tool to identify dechlorinating bacteria in groundwater contaminated with chloroethenes. The target DNA regions to identify these microorganism were the 16s rDNA specific for dehalococcoides sp. and Desulfuromonas and DNA sequences coding for the reductive dehalogenase enzymes pceA, tceA, bvcA and vcrA. Bacteria able to transform PCE into DCE were detected in all groundwater samples. Bacteria able to transform VC into ethene were found only in one of the samples. This study shows that PCR analysis of 16s rDNA and reductive dehalogenase gene sequences together with microcosm results are useful tools to analyze the populations of reductive dechlorinators and their activity in a given site.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmicrobial transporten_US
dc.subjectPCE degradationen_US
dc.subjectchlorinated ethenesen_US
dc.subjectreducer bacteriaen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaier, Raina M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1868en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746423en_US
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