Mexican Origin Parents with Special Needs Children: Using a Critically Compassionate Intellectualism Model to Support and Foster Their Participation in U.S. Schools Through a Participatory Action Research Project

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194619
Title:
Mexican Origin Parents with Special Needs Children: Using a Critically Compassionate Intellectualism Model to Support and Foster Their Participation in U.S. Schools Through a Participatory Action Research Project
Author:
Santamaria, Cristina Corrine
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this investigation was to support and foster parent participation among Mexican origin parents of special needs children. However, a limited amount of empirical research existed that considered Mexican origin parents' understanding of participation in general and special education settings.Parent participation was viewed as a dynamic and evolving process through which parent participants could construct knowledge and meaning. Novice (newcomer) parents worked with veteran (experienced) parents to learn about participation. Critical and reflective discussions were central to their learning and parents moved toward full participation as they developed confidence, skills, and awareness about themselves as agents of change.A Critically Compassionate Intellectualism (CCI) model, derived from Sociocultural Theory and Critical Race Theory (CRT), was applied to analyze the ways parents demonstrated their understanding of participation through cooperation, caring, and critical consciousness. A Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach was implemented as a method through which parents' roles in the investigation and their definitions of participation were explored.Primary data sources included individual and focus group interviews, discussion/planning sessions, and a debriefing session. Secondary sources consisted of weekly journals, an open-ended survey, and audio memos. Most data sources were transcribed and coded using an "open-coding" procedure. Then primary sources were coded a second time for a more detailed analysis of parents' evolving views of participation.Novice parents reported that within a cooperative environment they could share their thoughts and feelings about their children. They acknowledged that their voices were heard and, therefore, felt validated and supported. Parents' critical consciousness was raised as they felt more confident in generating positive changes for their children. Both veteran and novice parents' roles changed over time. Veteran parents' leadership grew and novice parents became more active and vocal in the research process.This study presented alternative ways to understand parent participation. Being listened to and respected by teachers and school administrators were important reasons for parents' active participation. Feeling supported at IEP meetings and having open communication with teachers also were important factors contributing to parents' participation. Definitions of participation should continue to expand to allow a space for parents' diverse experiences.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Bilingual Special Education; Mexican families; Parent Participation; Participatory Action Research; Social Justice; Sociocultural theory
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education & Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fletcher, Todd V.; Cammarota, Julio
Committee Chair:
Fletcher, Todd V.; Cammarota, Julio

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMexican Origin Parents with Special Needs Children: Using a Critically Compassionate Intellectualism Model to Support and Foster Their Participation in U.S. Schools Through a Participatory Action Research Projecten_US
dc.creatorSantamaria, Cristina Corrineen_US
dc.contributor.authorSantamaria, Cristina Corrineen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this investigation was to support and foster parent participation among Mexican origin parents of special needs children. However, a limited amount of empirical research existed that considered Mexican origin parents' understanding of participation in general and special education settings.Parent participation was viewed as a dynamic and evolving process through which parent participants could construct knowledge and meaning. Novice (newcomer) parents worked with veteran (experienced) parents to learn about participation. Critical and reflective discussions were central to their learning and parents moved toward full participation as they developed confidence, skills, and awareness about themselves as agents of change.A Critically Compassionate Intellectualism (CCI) model, derived from Sociocultural Theory and Critical Race Theory (CRT), was applied to analyze the ways parents demonstrated their understanding of participation through cooperation, caring, and critical consciousness. A Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach was implemented as a method through which parents' roles in the investigation and their definitions of participation were explored.Primary data sources included individual and focus group interviews, discussion/planning sessions, and a debriefing session. Secondary sources consisted of weekly journals, an open-ended survey, and audio memos. Most data sources were transcribed and coded using an "open-coding" procedure. Then primary sources were coded a second time for a more detailed analysis of parents' evolving views of participation.Novice parents reported that within a cooperative environment they could share their thoughts and feelings about their children. They acknowledged that their voices were heard and, therefore, felt validated and supported. Parents' critical consciousness was raised as they felt more confident in generating positive changes for their children. Both veteran and novice parents' roles changed over time. Veteran parents' leadership grew and novice parents became more active and vocal in the research process.This study presented alternative ways to understand parent participation. Being listened to and respected by teachers and school administrators were important reasons for parents' active participation. Feeling supported at IEP meetings and having open communication with teachers also were important factors contributing to parents' participation. Definitions of participation should continue to expand to allow a space for parents' diverse experiences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBilingual Special Educationen_US
dc.subjectMexican familiesen_US
dc.subjectParent Participationen_US
dc.subjectParticipatory Action Researchen_US
dc.subjectSocial Justiceen_US
dc.subjectSociocultural theoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFletcher, Todd V.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorCammarota, Julioen_US
dc.contributor.chairFletcher, Todd V.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCammarota, Julioen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArtiles, Alfredo J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaker, June C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10290en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750910en_US
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