Phonetics and Phonology of Regressive Voicing Assimilation in Russian Native and Non-native Speech

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194543
Title:
Phonetics and Phonology of Regressive Voicing Assimilation in Russian Native and Non-native Speech
Author:
Samokhina, Natalya
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent years, a great deal of research on second language (L2) acquisition has been concerned with non-target production of L2 learners, addressing issues such as native language (L1) transfer into L2 and the nature and source of developmental errors. Previous studies have mostly focused on the analysis of discrete L2 segments (Flege 1987, 1999; Major & Kim 1996), rather than on L2 phonological patterns. This study, however, examines the production of sequences of sounds in Russian L1 and L2 from both the phonetic and phonological perspectives.This dissertation investigates native and non-native production of real and nonsense words containing obstruent clusters in which a phonological phenomenon known as regressive voicing assimilation is required. In Russian, forms like lodka `boat' are rendered orthographically with a voiced obstruent which is pronounced as a voiceless one when followed by a voiceless obstruent. The results of the experiments reveal several production patterns in L1 and L2 speech as well as gradiency in devoicing which are further analyzed within the stochastic Optimality Theory framework. Categorical production is accounted for by the re-ranking of L1 and L2 constraints; whereas, gradiency in production is viewed as a result of the re-ranking of constraints within phonetically detailed constraint families.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
gradiency; phonetics and phonology; regressive voicing assimilation; Russian; second language acquisition; stochastic OT
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition & Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ohala, Diane; Warner, Natasha

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePhonetics and Phonology of Regressive Voicing Assimilation in Russian Native and Non-native Speechen_US
dc.creatorSamokhina, Natalyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamokhina, Natalyaen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a great deal of research on second language (L2) acquisition has been concerned with non-target production of L2 learners, addressing issues such as native language (L1) transfer into L2 and the nature and source of developmental errors. Previous studies have mostly focused on the analysis of discrete L2 segments (Flege 1987, 1999; Major & Kim 1996), rather than on L2 phonological patterns. This study, however, examines the production of sequences of sounds in Russian L1 and L2 from both the phonetic and phonological perspectives.This dissertation investigates native and non-native production of real and nonsense words containing obstruent clusters in which a phonological phenomenon known as regressive voicing assimilation is required. In Russian, forms like lodka `boat' are rendered orthographically with a voiced obstruent which is pronounced as a voiceless one when followed by a voiceless obstruent. The results of the experiments reveal several production patterns in L1 and L2 speech as well as gradiency in devoicing which are further analyzed within the stochastic Optimality Theory framework. Categorical production is accounted for by the re-ranking of L1 and L2 constraints; whereas, gradiency in production is viewed as a result of the re-ranking of constraints within phonetically detailed constraint families.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectgradiencyen_US
dc.subjectphonetics and phonologyen_US
dc.subjectregressive voicing assimilationen_US
dc.subjectRussianen_US
dc.subjectsecond language acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectstochastic OTen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOhala, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.chairWarner, Natashaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOhala, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarner, Natashaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHammond, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11221en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261065en_US
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