Frontal Mechanisms in Language Pragmatics: Neuropsychological and Electrophysiological Evidence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194525
Title:
Frontal Mechanisms in Language Pragmatics: Neuropsychological and Electrophysiological Evidence
Author:
Rybarova, Dusana
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Whereas some researchers claim that the holistic processing of the right hemisphere is essential for contextual integration in language pragmatics (Myers, 2001, Myers, 2005), results of other studies point to involvement of executive processes of the frontal lobes (McDonald & Pearce, 1998; Bernicot & Dardier, 2001). This study examined the role of frontal lobes in language pragmatics by testing performance of young adults and older adults on selected standardized pragmatic inferences called 'implicitures'. Implicitures were first presented free-standing and then embedded in contexts that either supported (enabling contexts) or cancelled (cancelling contexts) their preferred meaning. First, implicitures were examined using behavioral reaction time measures in young adults. The second part of the project addressed the question about involvement of frontal lobes in language pragmatics by testing older adults with varying degrees of frontal function on processing of implicitures. Finally, event-related potential responses to implicitures with and without context in young adults were explored. Results revealed a strong relationship between frontal lobes and performance on implicitures in canceling contexts in older adults. There was no significant effect for free-standing implicitures and implicitures presented in enabling contexts. In addition, an N400 was observed to free-standing implicitures, but implicitures in context elicited a negative component in the later 400 ms window at the anterior sites. These results indicate that frontal lobes are important for pragmatic processing requiring integration of linguistic context with an utterance for the correct interpretation. Consequences of our findings for models of impliciture processing and accounts of neural architecture underlying language pragmatics are considered.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
language pragmatics; frontal lobes; implicitures; language in context
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Garrett, Merrill F
Committee Chair:
Garrett, Merrill F

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFrontal Mechanisms in Language Pragmatics: Neuropsychological and Electrophysiological Evidenceen_US
dc.creatorRybarova, Dusanaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRybarova, Dusanaen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhereas some researchers claim that the holistic processing of the right hemisphere is essential for contextual integration in language pragmatics (Myers, 2001, Myers, 2005), results of other studies point to involvement of executive processes of the frontal lobes (McDonald & Pearce, 1998; Bernicot & Dardier, 2001). This study examined the role of frontal lobes in language pragmatics by testing performance of young adults and older adults on selected standardized pragmatic inferences called 'implicitures'. Implicitures were first presented free-standing and then embedded in contexts that either supported (enabling contexts) or cancelled (cancelling contexts) their preferred meaning. First, implicitures were examined using behavioral reaction time measures in young adults. The second part of the project addressed the question about involvement of frontal lobes in language pragmatics by testing older adults with varying degrees of frontal function on processing of implicitures. Finally, event-related potential responses to implicitures with and without context in young adults were explored. Results revealed a strong relationship between frontal lobes and performance on implicitures in canceling contexts in older adults. There was no significant effect for free-standing implicitures and implicitures presented in enabling contexts. In addition, an N400 was observed to free-standing implicitures, but implicitures in context elicited a negative component in the later 400 ms window at the anterior sites. These results indicate that frontal lobes are important for pragmatic processing requiring integration of linguistic context with an utterance for the correct interpretation. Consequences of our findings for models of impliciture processing and accounts of neural architecture underlying language pragmatics are considered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectlanguage pragmaticsen_US
dc.subjectfrontal lobesen_US
dc.subjectimplicituresen_US
dc.subjectlanguage in contexten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGarrett, Merrill Fen_US
dc.contributor.chairGarrett, Merrill Fen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarnish, Robert M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2507en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748463en_US
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