Mediated Representations of Latinos and the United States-Mexico Border in the Media

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194501
Title:
Mediated Representations of Latinos and the United States-Mexico Border in the Media
Author:
Romo, Christine Gamez
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Media is used to shape the identity of a nation. It serves as a vehicle to reassure and reaffirm the dominant group's perspective and ideals in order to maintain the status quo. The media has its greatest influence on people who do not have a frame of reference to help them interpret what they see. People who have not had direct contact with the subject being presented may believe that what they are viewing is an accurate depiction. Latinos are often misrepresented on television and film and are a minority faced with constant character distortion. The stereotyping of Latinos has changed very little since the 1970's when it was first called to the attention of the United States House and Senate. This is due in part to the nation's media outlets, which are still the main visual vehicles that perpetuate these stereotypes. This dissertation examines mediated representations of Latinos and the United States-Mexico Border in films, produced in Hollywood and Mexico City, as well as U.S. network newscasts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Spanish
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Spanish; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Tatum, Charles M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMediated Representations of Latinos and the United States-Mexico Border in the Mediaen_US
dc.creatorRomo, Christine Gamezen_US
dc.contributor.authorRomo, Christine Gamezen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMedia is used to shape the identity of a nation. It serves as a vehicle to reassure and reaffirm the dominant group's perspective and ideals in order to maintain the status quo. The media has its greatest influence on people who do not have a frame of reference to help them interpret what they see. People who have not had direct contact with the subject being presented may believe that what they are viewing is an accurate depiction. Latinos are often misrepresented on television and film and are a minority faced with constant character distortion. The stereotyping of Latinos has changed very little since the 1970's when it was first called to the attention of the United States House and Senate. This is due in part to the nation's media outlets, which are still the main visual vehicles that perpetuate these stereotypes. This dissertation examines mediated representations of Latinos and the United States-Mexico Border in films, produced in Hollywood and Mexico City, as well as U.S. network newscasts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSpanishen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairTatum, Charles M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitch, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGutierrez, Lauraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1555en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356454en_US
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