Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194495
Title:
Transport Phenomena in Drinking Water Systems
Author:
Romero Gomez, Pedro
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The current computer models used for simulating water quality in potable water distribution systems assume perfect mixing at pipe junctions and non-dispersive solute transport in pipe flows. To improve the prediction accuracy, the present study examines and expands these modeling assumptions using transport phenomena analyses. Whereas the level of solute mixing at a cross-type junction is evaluated numerically via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the axial transport in laminar flows is investigated with both CFD simulations and corresponding experimental runs in a single pipe. The findings show that solute mixing at junctions is rather incomplete owing to the limited spatio-temporal interaction that occurs between incoming flows with different qualities. Incomplete mixing shifts the expected propagation patterns of a chemical or microbial constituent from widely-spread to narrowly-concentrated over the service area. On the other hand, solute dispersion is found to prevail over advective transport in laminar pipe flows. Thus, this work develops axial dispersion rates through parameter optimization techniques. By accounting for axial dispersive effects, the patterns of solute delivery shifted from high concentrations over short time periods to lower doses at prolonged exposure times. In addition, the present study integrates the incomplete mixing model into the optimal placement of water quality monitoring stations aimed at detecting contaminant intrusions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
axial dispersion; drinking water; mixing; model; quality; sensor location
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Choi, Christopher Y.
Committee Chair:
Choi, Christopher Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTransport Phenomena in Drinking Water Systemsen_US
dc.creatorRomero Gomez, Pedroen_US
dc.contributor.authorRomero Gomez, Pedroen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current computer models used for simulating water quality in potable water distribution systems assume perfect mixing at pipe junctions and non-dispersive solute transport in pipe flows. To improve the prediction accuracy, the present study examines and expands these modeling assumptions using transport phenomena analyses. Whereas the level of solute mixing at a cross-type junction is evaluated numerically via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the axial transport in laminar flows is investigated with both CFD simulations and corresponding experimental runs in a single pipe. The findings show that solute mixing at junctions is rather incomplete owing to the limited spatio-temporal interaction that occurs between incoming flows with different qualities. Incomplete mixing shifts the expected propagation patterns of a chemical or microbial constituent from widely-spread to narrowly-concentrated over the service area. On the other hand, solute dispersion is found to prevail over advective transport in laminar pipe flows. Thus, this work develops axial dispersion rates through parameter optimization techniques. By accounting for axial dispersive effects, the patterns of solute delivery shifted from high concentrations over short time periods to lower doses at prolonged exposure times. In addition, the present study integrates the incomplete mixing model into the optimal placement of water quality monitoring stations aimed at detecting contaminant intrusions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaxial dispersionen_US
dc.subjectdrinking wateren_US
dc.subjectmixingen_US
dc.subjectmodelen_US
dc.subjectqualityen_US
dc.subjectsensor locationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.contributor.chairChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKacira, Muraten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Mark R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansey, Kevin E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10818en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753677en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.