Students With Learning Disabilities And Their Perceptions In Relation To Their Abilities To Self-Advocate: Implications For Secondary And Post-Secondary Education: A Qualitative Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194493
Title:
Students With Learning Disabilities And Their Perceptions In Relation To Their Abilities To Self-Advocate: Implications For Secondary And Post-Secondary Education: A Qualitative Analysis
Author:
Rojas, Colleen
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Open-ended interview questions were asked to ten college freshmen with learning disabilities (LD) to provide the primary source of data in this qualitative study. This was done to explore their perceptions in relation to their abilities to self-advocate. Student participants were chosen based on meeting the criteria of having a diagnosed specific learning disability, having qualified and received special education services in high school, and at the time of the study were receiving accommodations through the Disability Resource Center (DRC) at the University of Arizona (UA). Students were further identified as members of a "successful" group with a first semester grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher, or members of "jeopardy" group with a first semester GPA of below 2.0 and the academic status of probation. This was done in order to ensure that I included perceptions of students at the high and low range academic status levels in this sample, not to compare or contrast the two groups. Interviews yielded information about students' perceptions of their ability to self-advocate, their perceptions of their disability, their involvement in educational planning, and what they considered to be indicators of success. Data were analyzed to determine themes related to student success and difficulties. Suggestions for further research and information for future practice are offered.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education & Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Amos
Committee Chair:
Sales, Amos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStudents With Learning Disabilities And Their Perceptions In Relation To Their Abilities To Self-Advocate: Implications For Secondary And Post-Secondary Education: A Qualitative Analysisen_US
dc.creatorRojas, Colleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRojas, Colleenen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOpen-ended interview questions were asked to ten college freshmen with learning disabilities (LD) to provide the primary source of data in this qualitative study. This was done to explore their perceptions in relation to their abilities to self-advocate. Student participants were chosen based on meeting the criteria of having a diagnosed specific learning disability, having qualified and received special education services in high school, and at the time of the study were receiving accommodations through the Disability Resource Center (DRC) at the University of Arizona (UA). Students were further identified as members of a "successful" group with a first semester grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher, or members of "jeopardy" group with a first semester GPA of below 2.0 and the academic status of probation. This was done in order to ensure that I included perceptions of students at the high and low range academic status levels in this sample, not to compare or contrast the two groups. Interviews yielded information about students' perceptions of their ability to self-advocate, their perceptions of their disability, their involvement in educational planning, and what they considered to be indicators of success. Data were analyzed to determine themes related to student success and difficulties. Suggestions for further research and information for future practice are offered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.chairSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLiaupsin, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2412en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748444en_US
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