Ontogenetic Patterns of Positional Behavior in Cebus Capucinus and Alouatta Palliata

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194475
Title:
Ontogenetic Patterns of Positional Behavior in Cebus Capucinus and Alouatta Palliata
Author:
Bezanson, Michelle
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Positional behavior is the measurable and observable link between the biology and behavior of an animal in its environment. In this dissertation, I examine ontogenetic patterns of positional behavior in infant, juvenile, and adult white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) inhabiting the same tropical forest in Costa Rica. During growth and development ontogenetic changes in body size, limb proportions, and motor skills are likely to influence locomotion and posture through the arboreal canopy. I collected data on positional behavior, activity, prehensile-tail use, branch size, branch angle, and crown location during a 12 month period at Estación Biológica La Suerte in northeastern Costa Rica. The data set is comprised of 401.3 hours of data on Cebus capucinus and 554.3 hours of data on Alouatta palliata totaling 955.7 hours of data or 57,344 individual activity records.Life history timing and differences in rates of growth did not predictably influence the development of adult-like positional behaviors in Cebus and Alouatta. In both species, infancy was characterized by high proportions of dorsal, ventral, and side riding on the mother with smaller proportions of independent positional modes observed during play, explore, active posture, and feed/forage. Young Cebus resembled the adult pattern of positional behavior by six months of age while howlers exhibited significant differences in several positional behavior categories through 24 months of age. The positional repertoire of both species revealed similarities in the types of modes used during feed/forage and travel in juveniles and adults. For example, in juvenile and adult age categories of Cebus, feeding and foraging included high proportions of quadrupedal walk, sit, and squat in conjunction with climbing, leaping, and suspensory behaviors. In howlers, the degree to which coordination and increases in body mass during ontogeny as limiting factors in the development of adult-like positional competence is unclear. Data presented here suggest that the environment exerts different pressures on growing Cebus and Alouatta that may relate to diet, energy expenditure, foraging skill, and/or social learning.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
white-faced capuchin; mantled howler; ontogeny; positional behavior; Capuchin monkeys; Howler monkeys
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morbeck, Mary Ellen
Committee Chair:
Morbeck, Mary Ellen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleOntogenetic Patterns of Positional Behavior in Cebus Capucinus and Alouatta Palliataen_US
dc.creatorBezanson, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBezanson, Michelleen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPositional behavior is the measurable and observable link between the biology and behavior of an animal in its environment. In this dissertation, I examine ontogenetic patterns of positional behavior in infant, juvenile, and adult white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) inhabiting the same tropical forest in Costa Rica. During growth and development ontogenetic changes in body size, limb proportions, and motor skills are likely to influence locomotion and posture through the arboreal canopy. I collected data on positional behavior, activity, prehensile-tail use, branch size, branch angle, and crown location during a 12 month period at Estación Biológica La Suerte in northeastern Costa Rica. The data set is comprised of 401.3 hours of data on Cebus capucinus and 554.3 hours of data on Alouatta palliata totaling 955.7 hours of data or 57,344 individual activity records.Life history timing and differences in rates of growth did not predictably influence the development of adult-like positional behaviors in Cebus and Alouatta. In both species, infancy was characterized by high proportions of dorsal, ventral, and side riding on the mother with smaller proportions of independent positional modes observed during play, explore, active posture, and feed/forage. Young Cebus resembled the adult pattern of positional behavior by six months of age while howlers exhibited significant differences in several positional behavior categories through 24 months of age. The positional repertoire of both species revealed similarities in the types of modes used during feed/forage and travel in juveniles and adults. For example, in juvenile and adult age categories of Cebus, feeding and foraging included high proportions of quadrupedal walk, sit, and squat in conjunction with climbing, leaping, and suspensory behaviors. In howlers, the degree to which coordination and increases in body mass during ontogeny as limiting factors in the development of adult-like positional competence is unclear. Data presented here suggest that the environment exerts different pressures on growing Cebus and Alouatta that may relate to diet, energy expenditure, foraging skill, and/or social learning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectwhite-faced capuchinen_US
dc.subjectmantled howleren_US
dc.subjectontogenyen_US
dc.subjectpositional behavioren_US
dc.subjectCapuchin monkeysen_US
dc.subjectHowler monkeysen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorbeck, Mary Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.chairMorbeck, Mary Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZegura, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGillett-Netting, Rhondaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNachman, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1690en_US
dc.identifier.oclc71794957en_US
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