THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTRACELLULAR NANOSENSORS: ACID-DEGRADABLE POLYMERIZED PHOSPHOLIPID VESICLES AND FLUORESCENT LABELS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194470
Title:
THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTRACELLULAR NANOSENSORS: ACID-DEGRADABLE POLYMERIZED PHOSPHOLIPID VESICLES AND FLUORESCENT LABELS
Author:
Roberts, David
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Phospholipid vesicles are biocompatible, and have potential for intracellular applications, but minimal membrane integrity limits their use in membrane-rich environments. Stabilized membranes overcome this limitation while maintaining biocompatible surface structures. Additionally, the modularity of phospholipid bilayer makes them ideal components when designing biologically inspired sensors. Membrane composition can be tailored to specific applications, transmembrane proteins can provide added functionalities, and the isolated interior can prevent cytotoxic and interfering detection chemistries from altering the cellular environment. This work has focused on expanding the capabilities of stabilized phospholipid membranes, and determining which formulations hold promise in developing stabilized phospholipid vesicle nanosensors.Current membrane stabilization methods suffer from either incomplete stabilization, or irreversible stabilization limiting the applications of vesicle nanosensors. Therefore, a facile method to prepare robust phospholipid vesicles using commonly available phospholipids stabilized via the formation of an interpenetrating, acid-labile, cross-linked polymer network that imparts controlled polymer destabilization and subsequent vesicle degradation was developed. Upon exposure to acidic conditions, the highly cross-linked polymer network was converted to linear polymers, substantially reducing vesicle stability upon exposure to chemical and physical insults. The resultant transiently stabilized vesicles have potential for enhanced drug delivery and chemical sensing applications requiring minimal membrane defects, and allow for improved physiological clearance.Some vesicle nanosensor schemes may require the passive diffusion of low molecular weight species across the membrane in addition to controllable degradation. Therefore, the acid-degradable, polymer-stabilized, phospholipid vesicle production method was extended to bis-SorbPC membranes by simultaneously polymerizing the vesicle with an acetal-containing cross-linker. The vesicles display prolonged stability under physiological conditions, and significant additional stability compared to vesicles composed of naturally occurring phospholipids. The vesicles demonstrated potential utility for sensing and therapeutic applications.Phospholipid vesicles can also serve as labels to observe movement in macromolecular biological assemblies, but a dearth of caged fluorescent labels limits design and function. Therefore, the first caged fluorescent thiol was synthesized, shown to label amines rapidly, and demonstrated the required photolytic properties. The caged fluorescent thiol has potential as a label in observing the movement of macromolecular biological assemblies and as a fluorescent probe for observing endosomal trafficking and release.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
acid-degradable cross-linker; caged fluorescein; nanosensor; phospholipid vesicle; rapid labeling
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Aspinwall, Craig A.
Committee Chair:
Aspinwall, Craig A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTHE DEVELOPMENT OF INTRACELLULAR NANOSENSORS: ACID-DEGRADABLE POLYMERIZED PHOSPHOLIPID VESICLES AND FLUORESCENT LABELSen_US
dc.creatorRoberts, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhospholipid vesicles are biocompatible, and have potential for intracellular applications, but minimal membrane integrity limits their use in membrane-rich environments. Stabilized membranes overcome this limitation while maintaining biocompatible surface structures. Additionally, the modularity of phospholipid bilayer makes them ideal components when designing biologically inspired sensors. Membrane composition can be tailored to specific applications, transmembrane proteins can provide added functionalities, and the isolated interior can prevent cytotoxic and interfering detection chemistries from altering the cellular environment. This work has focused on expanding the capabilities of stabilized phospholipid membranes, and determining which formulations hold promise in developing stabilized phospholipid vesicle nanosensors.Current membrane stabilization methods suffer from either incomplete stabilization, or irreversible stabilization limiting the applications of vesicle nanosensors. Therefore, a facile method to prepare robust phospholipid vesicles using commonly available phospholipids stabilized via the formation of an interpenetrating, acid-labile, cross-linked polymer network that imparts controlled polymer destabilization and subsequent vesicle degradation was developed. Upon exposure to acidic conditions, the highly cross-linked polymer network was converted to linear polymers, substantially reducing vesicle stability upon exposure to chemical and physical insults. The resultant transiently stabilized vesicles have potential for enhanced drug delivery and chemical sensing applications requiring minimal membrane defects, and allow for improved physiological clearance.Some vesicle nanosensor schemes may require the passive diffusion of low molecular weight species across the membrane in addition to controllable degradation. Therefore, the acid-degradable, polymer-stabilized, phospholipid vesicle production method was extended to bis-SorbPC membranes by simultaneously polymerizing the vesicle with an acetal-containing cross-linker. The vesicles display prolonged stability under physiological conditions, and significant additional stability compared to vesicles composed of naturally occurring phospholipids. The vesicles demonstrated potential utility for sensing and therapeutic applications.Phospholipid vesicles can also serve as labels to observe movement in macromolecular biological assemblies, but a dearth of caged fluorescent labels limits design and function. Therefore, the first caged fluorescent thiol was synthesized, shown to label amines rapidly, and demonstrated the required photolytic properties. The caged fluorescent thiol has potential as a label in observing the movement of macromolecular biological assemblies and as a fluorescent probe for observing endosomal trafficking and release.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectacid-degradable cross-linkeren_US
dc.subjectcaged fluoresceinen_US
dc.subjectnanosensoren_US
dc.subjectphospholipid vesicleen_US
dc.subjectrapid labelingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAspinwall, Craig A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairAspinwall, Craig A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWysocki, Vickien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenton, M. B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanov, Andreien_US
dc.identifier.proquest10868en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753775en_US
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