Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194467
Title:
Non-Traditional Predictors to Evaluate Dropout Rates
Author:
Roary-Cook, Mary Christianna
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
High attrition rates from community participatory research studies need to be explored more by non-traditional methods and participant profiles need to be developed to prevent high attrition rates. The purpose of this dissertation is to characterize compliance and drop out rates using the cardiovascular disease IQ quiz and the life priorities questionnaire. It is important to examine both compliance and dropouts in this context because both diabetes and cardiovascular disease are emerging as a major focus of public health efforts in the United States and abroad. These diseases are accelerating due to the current trends in obesity, which is a preventable, modifiable risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease continue to be the number seven and number one leading causes of death, respectively. We explore these concepts in a largely Hispanic border community in the Southwest, in the small town of Douglas, Arizona. The Hispanic population is increasing in the United States and is now the most populous minority group. Additionally, among this group are some of the highest rates of pre-diabetes, diabetes, and uncontrolled diabetes, all cardiovascular disease risk factors. We found that the cardiovascular disease IQ quiz was a much stronger predictor for compliance and drop out rates in this sample population than the life priorities questionnaire. Compliance did not seem to differ among the study participants who remained in the study. Interestingly, among the participants who were compliant, especially those who kept their eye check-up, were also those more likely to have health insurance and be employed. Though males only represented about 10% of the population sample, they tended to drop out more frequently than females. Dropouts tended to be younger, gainfully employed, and more educated. Qualitative analysis and logistic regression will further help explain the aforementioned associations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Community-Based Participatory Research; Cardiovascular Disease; Diabetes; Prevention; Hispanics; Communtity Health Workers
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Epidemiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ranger-Moore, James
Committee Chair:
Ranger-Moore, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleNon-Traditional Predictors to Evaluate Dropout Ratesen_US
dc.creatorRoary-Cook, Mary Christiannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoary-Cook, Mary Christiannaen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh attrition rates from community participatory research studies need to be explored more by non-traditional methods and participant profiles need to be developed to prevent high attrition rates. The purpose of this dissertation is to characterize compliance and drop out rates using the cardiovascular disease IQ quiz and the life priorities questionnaire. It is important to examine both compliance and dropouts in this context because both diabetes and cardiovascular disease are emerging as a major focus of public health efforts in the United States and abroad. These diseases are accelerating due to the current trends in obesity, which is a preventable, modifiable risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease continue to be the number seven and number one leading causes of death, respectively. We explore these concepts in a largely Hispanic border community in the Southwest, in the small town of Douglas, Arizona. The Hispanic population is increasing in the United States and is now the most populous minority group. Additionally, among this group are some of the highest rates of pre-diabetes, diabetes, and uncontrolled diabetes, all cardiovascular disease risk factors. We found that the cardiovascular disease IQ quiz was a much stronger predictor for compliance and drop out rates in this sample population than the life priorities questionnaire. Compliance did not seem to differ among the study participants who remained in the study. Interestingly, among the participants who were compliant, especially those who kept their eye check-up, were also those more likely to have health insurance and be employed. Though males only represented about 10% of the population sample, they tended to drop out more frequently than females. Dropouts tended to be younger, gainfully employed, and more educated. Qualitative analysis and logistic regression will further help explain the aforementioned associations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Participatory Researchen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.subjectHispanicsen_US
dc.subjectCommuntity Health Workersen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRanger-Moore, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.chairRanger-Moore, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMohler, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEstrada, Antonioen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarcia, Franciscoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2680en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749683en_US
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