Making An Unknown Choral-Orchestral Work Accessible: Performing Choruses From Brahms' Cantata Rinaldo

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194462
Title:
Making An Unknown Choral-Orchestral Work Accessible: Performing Choruses From Brahms' Cantata Rinaldo
Author:
Rivera, Jr., Guadalupe
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Of Brahms' choral output, a few works seem to be studied, performed, recorded more or, in general, more popular than others. Brahms' cantata Rinaldo, composed between 1863 and 1868, is a relatively unknown and neglected work worthy of study and performance.For the cantata Rinaldo, Brahms chose a poem by Goethe that is derived from Torquato Tasso's epic poem Gerusalemme Liberata (Jerusalem Delivered), which recounts the mystical tale of the Crusader Knight Rinaldo (a solo tenor) who is persuaded by his crew (the men's chorus) to leave the enchantress Armida and return to war. In this study, I will demonstrate that Brahms' cantata Rinaldo, a work unfamiliar to many American choral conductors, includes two well-crafted choruses that can be extracted from the cantata as independent movements, and used as repertory for men's choirs. In order to accomplish this, I will focus on the origination and comparison of Torquato Tasso's tale and Goethe's own adaptation of the story. I will also examine Brahms' early life, his acquirement of Goethe's text, and provide an in-depth look at two of the choruses from the cantata: "Zuruck nur!" and "Auf dem Meere."Since these movements have not been published as independent choral octavos, an important and primary component of my project will be to create a new edition of these movements. The source material I used to create the editions is Brahms' original manuscript scores of Rinaldo. Additionally, a complete translation of Rinaldo, an IPA pronunciation guide for the edition, and a complete transcription of an interview with Maestro Helmuth Rilling concerning Rinaldo are included in the appendices of this document.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Auf dem Meere; Cantata; Johannes Brahms; Rinaldo; Schlusschor; Zuruck nur
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chamberlain, Bruce B.
Committee Chair:
Chamberlain, Bruce B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleMaking An Unknown Choral-Orchestral Work Accessible: Performing Choruses From Brahms' Cantata Rinaldoen_US
dc.creatorRivera, Jr., Guadalupeen_US
dc.contributor.authorRivera, Jr., Guadalupeen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOf Brahms' choral output, a few works seem to be studied, performed, recorded more or, in general, more popular than others. Brahms' cantata Rinaldo, composed between 1863 and 1868, is a relatively unknown and neglected work worthy of study and performance.For the cantata Rinaldo, Brahms chose a poem by Goethe that is derived from Torquato Tasso's epic poem Gerusalemme Liberata (Jerusalem Delivered), which recounts the mystical tale of the Crusader Knight Rinaldo (a solo tenor) who is persuaded by his crew (the men's chorus) to leave the enchantress Armida and return to war. In this study, I will demonstrate that Brahms' cantata Rinaldo, a work unfamiliar to many American choral conductors, includes two well-crafted choruses that can be extracted from the cantata as independent movements, and used as repertory for men's choirs. In order to accomplish this, I will focus on the origination and comparison of Torquato Tasso's tale and Goethe's own adaptation of the story. I will also examine Brahms' early life, his acquirement of Goethe's text, and provide an in-depth look at two of the choruses from the cantata: "Zuruck nur!" and "Auf dem Meere."Since these movements have not been published as independent choral octavos, an important and primary component of my project will be to create a new edition of these movements. The source material I used to create the editions is Brahms' original manuscript scores of Rinaldo. Additionally, a complete translation of Rinaldo, an IPA pronunciation guide for the edition, and a complete transcription of an interview with Maestro Helmuth Rilling concerning Rinaldo are included in the appendices of this document.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAuf dem Meereen_US
dc.subjectCantataen_US
dc.subjectJohannes Brahmsen_US
dc.subjectRinaldoen_US
dc.subjectSchlusschoren_US
dc.subjectZuruck nuren_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChamberlain, Bruce B.en_US
dc.contributor.chairChamberlain, Bruce B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchauer, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrobeck, John T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10901en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260950en_US
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