Spectroscopic Characterization of Model Organic Pollutant Interactions with Mineral Oxide Surfaces

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194460
Title:
Spectroscopic Characterization of Model Organic Pollutant Interactions with Mineral Oxide Surfaces
Author:
Ringwald, Steven
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Vibrational spectroscopy is used to elucidate the adsorption mechanisms of model volatile organic pollutants with a variety of mineral oxides. Vapor phase adsorption processes are particularly important in the vadose zone of an aquifer, where void spaces are filled with air and vapor transport is significant. Gaining a better understanding of the interactions occurring at the oxide-air interface is critical in developing or improving remediation strategies. In this work, Raman and infrared spectroscopy are used to obtain molecularly specific information concerning model pollutant-oxide adsorption processes. The choices of pollutants are varied to include several classes of compounds. The interactions of azaarenes, aromatics, chlorinated aromatics, trichloroethylene, and tributyl phosphate are investigated with several mineral types. Pure mineral phases such as silica, alumina, hydrated iron oxide, and montmorillonite clay are used to provide a basis set of interactions, which can be extended to more complex systems in the future. Pollutantoxide interactions, including weak physisorption, hydrogen bonding, Bronsted acid-base, and Lewis acid-base, were identified in this work and varied depending on the specific pollutant-oxide system. This research provides surface adsorption information on environmentally relevant contaminants and the techniques may be utilized to verify the accuracy of pollutant fate and transport models and to improve remediation strategies for such pollutants.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
spectroscopic; characterization; oxide; surfaces; organic; pollutant
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pemberton, Jeanne E.
Committee Chair:
Pemberton, Jeanne E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSpectroscopic Characterization of Model Organic Pollutant Interactions with Mineral Oxide Surfacesen_US
dc.creatorRingwald, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorRingwald, Stevenen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVibrational spectroscopy is used to elucidate the adsorption mechanisms of model volatile organic pollutants with a variety of mineral oxides. Vapor phase adsorption processes are particularly important in the vadose zone of an aquifer, where void spaces are filled with air and vapor transport is significant. Gaining a better understanding of the interactions occurring at the oxide-air interface is critical in developing or improving remediation strategies. In this work, Raman and infrared spectroscopy are used to obtain molecularly specific information concerning model pollutant-oxide adsorption processes. The choices of pollutants are varied to include several classes of compounds. The interactions of azaarenes, aromatics, chlorinated aromatics, trichloroethylene, and tributyl phosphate are investigated with several mineral types. Pure mineral phases such as silica, alumina, hydrated iron oxide, and montmorillonite clay are used to provide a basis set of interactions, which can be extended to more complex systems in the future. Pollutantoxide interactions, including weak physisorption, hydrogen bonding, Bronsted acid-base, and Lewis acid-base, were identified in this work and varied depending on the specific pollutant-oxide system. This research provides surface adsorption information on environmentally relevant contaminants and the techniques may be utilized to verify the accuracy of pollutant fate and transport models and to improve remediation strategies for such pollutants.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectspectroscopicen_US
dc.subjectcharacterizationen_US
dc.subjectoxideen_US
dc.subjectsurfacesen_US
dc.subjectorganicen_US
dc.subjectpollutanten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurke, Michael F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBates, Robert B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Walter B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1799en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747561en_US
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