George Enescu's Second String Quartet Op.22 in G Major: Historical and Analytical Perspectives of this Late Work

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194447
Title:
George Enescu's Second String Quartet Op.22 in G Major: Historical and Analytical Perspectives of this Late Work
Author:
Restesan, Francisc T
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Through his Second String Quartet Op.22 in G-Major finished in 1954, the Romanian composer George Enescu (1881-1955) reached the peak of his compositional maturity in this chamber music genre. The quartet was the result of many years of gestation and versions as the result of his fecund musical intellect. Enescu treats freely the traditional forms in all four movements of the piece. The formal organization of the work is cyclical and the main theme that appears at the beginning of the exposition of the first movement is brought back in the reprise of the last movement in a grandiose manner, rounding up the whole piece. The unity of the thematic material throughout the work is assured by the use of sources drawn from Romanian folk music, becoming the subject for a large variety of rhythmic and melodic transformations. The use of Romanian folk elements with their typical Eastern-European modal intonations in combination with advanced western post-romantic and chromatic melodies create a verticality of mobile degrees built with added seconds, fourths, fifths and diminished sevenths. These two sources work successfully towards creating a highly complex and dramatic musical language. The presence of the B.A.C.H motive with its variants in the melodic lines, suggest the hypothesis of a discreet homage rendered to J.S. Bach on the occasion of his bicentenary of his death (1750-1950).
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Music
Degree Name:
DMA
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Rush, Mark

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGeorge Enescu's Second String Quartet Op.22 in G Major: Historical and Analytical Perspectives of this Late Worken_US
dc.creatorRestesan, Francisc Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorRestesan, Francisc Ten_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThrough his Second String Quartet Op.22 in G-Major finished in 1954, the Romanian composer George Enescu (1881-1955) reached the peak of his compositional maturity in this chamber music genre. The quartet was the result of many years of gestation and versions as the result of his fecund musical intellect. Enescu treats freely the traditional forms in all four movements of the piece. The formal organization of the work is cyclical and the main theme that appears at the beginning of the exposition of the first movement is brought back in the reprise of the last movement in a grandiose manner, rounding up the whole piece. The unity of the thematic material throughout the work is assured by the use of sources drawn from Romanian folk music, becoming the subject for a large variety of rhythmic and melodic transformations. The use of Romanian folk elements with their typical Eastern-European modal intonations in combination with advanced western post-romantic and chromatic melodies create a verticality of mobile degrees built with added seconds, fourths, fifths and diminished sevenths. These two sources work successfully towards creating a highly complex and dramatic musical language. The presence of the B.A.C.H motive with its variants in the melodic lines, suggest the hypothesis of a discreet homage rendered to J.S. Bach on the occasion of his bicentenary of his death (1750-1950).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
thesis.degree.nameDMAen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRush, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNeher, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberXiao, Hong-Meien_US
dc.identifier.proquest2056en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747165en_US
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