The Relationship Between Reading Performance and Discipline Referrals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194445
Title:
The Relationship Between Reading Performance and Discipline Referrals
Author:
Ressler, Robert
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this longitudinal study was to determine if a relationship between reading performance and discipline referral contacts could be found in a cohort of students at third and fifth grades. Archival data for a sample of 112 6th graders attending a select Hawaiian Island school were obtained from mandatory State assessment and discipline referral records. T-test and one-way analysis of variance were completed to evaluate the effects of grade, gender, SES, and ethnicity. Results of data analysis revealed no significant differences in reading performance for referred and non-referred subjects across all sampled groups. Implications for future studies suggest supplementing discipline referral data with additional behavioral measures such as behavior rating scales and observation. Increasing sample sizes to reflect a larger number of overall subjects across a wider range of grades is also needed. Finally, it is suggested that variables such as IQ, language functioning, and disabilities be included in future analyses.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education & Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala
Committee Chair:
Mishra, Shitala

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Reading Performance and Discipline Referralsen_US
dc.creatorRessler, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorRessler, Roberten_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this longitudinal study was to determine if a relationship between reading performance and discipline referral contacts could be found in a cohort of students at third and fifth grades. Archival data for a sample of 112 6th graders attending a select Hawaiian Island school were obtained from mandatory State assessment and discipline referral records. T-test and one-way analysis of variance were completed to evaluate the effects of grade, gender, SES, and ethnicity. Results of data analysis revealed no significant differences in reading performance for referred and non-referred subjects across all sampled groups. Implications for future studies suggest supplementing discipline referral data with additional behavioral measures such as behavior rating scales and observation. Increasing sample sizes to reflect a larger number of overall subjects across a wider range of grades is also needed. Finally, it is suggested that variables such as IQ, language functioning, and disabilities be included in future analyses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfant, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1305en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746254en_US
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