The Bassoon's Essential Role in the Evolution of the Wind Octet: The Serenade in Eb Major K. 375 by Mozart and the Octet for Winds by Stravinsky

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194443
Title:
The Bassoon's Essential Role in the Evolution of the Wind Octet: The Serenade in Eb Major K. 375 by Mozart and the Octet for Winds by Stravinsky
Author:
Renteria, Lisa M.
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is in one part to observe the evolution of the wind octet genre and another to research the evolution of the bassoon's role in this ensemble. Specifically the essential role of the two bassoons are revealed by showing that they are the only pair of instruments that remain intact in the wind octet ensemble from the time of Mozart to the time of Stravinsky. Because of this, they provide the wind octet it's characteristic sound. To illustrate these points, two significant wind octets were examined in detail: The Serenade in Eb, K. 375 (1782) by Mozart and the Octet for Winds (1923/revised 1952) by Stravinsky. Despite the long time span between these two works, and the obvious changes in instrumentation, the Octet for Winds by Stravinsky could be called an evolved version of the earlier traditional wind octet. The research within illustrates how the writing for the bassoons changed and stayed the same as related to range, articulation, technical demands, interaction and blending, idiomatic features and role between the years of 1782 and 1923. Other octets that fall between these dates were examined to demonstrate this evolution. Also, in order to have a better understanding of the Serenade by Mozart and Octet for winds by Stravinsky, their symphonic works were analyzed to determine how each composer wrote for the bassoon in other genres and this is compared to the use of the bassoon in their octets.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Wind Octet; Bassoon; Stravinsky; Mozart; Harmoniemusik
Degree Name:
DMA
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dietz, William
Committee Chair:
Dietz, William

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Bassoon's Essential Role in the Evolution of the Wind Octet: The Serenade in Eb Major K. 375 by Mozart and the Octet for Winds by Stravinskyen_US
dc.creatorRenteria, Lisa M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRenteria, Lisa M.en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is in one part to observe the evolution of the wind octet genre and another to research the evolution of the bassoon's role in this ensemble. Specifically the essential role of the two bassoons are revealed by showing that they are the only pair of instruments that remain intact in the wind octet ensemble from the time of Mozart to the time of Stravinsky. Because of this, they provide the wind octet it's characteristic sound. To illustrate these points, two significant wind octets were examined in detail: The Serenade in Eb, K. 375 (1782) by Mozart and the Octet for Winds (1923/revised 1952) by Stravinsky. Despite the long time span between these two works, and the obvious changes in instrumentation, the Octet for Winds by Stravinsky could be called an evolved version of the earlier traditional wind octet. The research within illustrates how the writing for the bassoons changed and stayed the same as related to range, articulation, technical demands, interaction and blending, idiomatic features and role between the years of 1782 and 1923. Other octets that fall between these dates were examined to demonstrate this evolution. Also, in order to have a better understanding of the Serenade by Mozart and Octet for winds by Stravinsky, their symphonic works were analyzed to determine how each composer wrote for the bassoon in other genres and this is compared to the use of the bassoon in their octets.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectWind Octeten_US
dc.subjectBassoonen_US
dc.subjectStravinskyen_US
dc.subjectMozarten_US
dc.subjectHarmoniemusiken_US
thesis.degree.nameDMAen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDietz, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.chairDietz, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKirkbride, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHanson, Gregen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2110en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748257en_US
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