To Us They Are Butterflies: A Case Study of the Educational Experience at an Urban Indigenous-Serving Charter School

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/194438
Title:
To Us They Are Butterflies: A Case Study of the Educational Experience at an Urban Indigenous-Serving Charter School
Author:
Reeves, Alison G.
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent years, increasing numbers of Indigenous communities in the United States have embraced charter schools as an alternative to traditional federal, district and parochial schools. Often this has been part of an effort begun to further such goals as language and cultural preservation, improved educational programs, and community control of schooling. This study presents, through a single qualitative, ethnographic case study, a detailed portrait of one urban, Indigenous-serving charter school with primary focus on graduates' educational experiences and an exploration of its meaning for them. A portrait of the school is presented, including: the school's history; its mission, goals, objectives; its organizational framework; its curriculum and instructional practices; and its structure and support services. Demographic information about the school's graduates is included. Next the alumni experience is explored in depth. Findings include alumni perceptions of their relationships with staff, alumni perceptions of the curriculum and instruction at the school, and alumni perceptions of school climate. Finally, the characteristics of the schooling occurring at the case site are described in light of the theoretical framework of the study which is based on Jim Cummins' (1989, 1992, 2000) theory concerning empowerment of minority students and the concept of subtractive and additive schooling as described by Angela Valenzuela (1999). Lessons from the case site are also considered more broadly in terms of the challenges and possibilities of Indigenous-serving charter schools in the current educational context.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Charter Schools; Indigenous Education; Native American Education; American Indian Education; Tohono O'odham; School Reform
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching & Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Johnson, Bruce P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTo Us They Are Butterflies: A Case Study of the Educational Experience at an Urban Indigenous-Serving Charter Schoolen_US
dc.creatorReeves, Alison G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReeves, Alison G.en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, increasing numbers of Indigenous communities in the United States have embraced charter schools as an alternative to traditional federal, district and parochial schools. Often this has been part of an effort begun to further such goals as language and cultural preservation, improved educational programs, and community control of schooling. This study presents, through a single qualitative, ethnographic case study, a detailed portrait of one urban, Indigenous-serving charter school with primary focus on graduates' educational experiences and an exploration of its meaning for them. A portrait of the school is presented, including: the school's history; its mission, goals, objectives; its organizational framework; its curriculum and instructional practices; and its structure and support services. Demographic information about the school's graduates is included. Next the alumni experience is explored in depth. Findings include alumni perceptions of their relationships with staff, alumni perceptions of the curriculum and instruction at the school, and alumni perceptions of school climate. Finally, the characteristics of the schooling occurring at the case site are described in light of the theoretical framework of the study which is based on Jim Cummins' (1989, 1992, 2000) theory concerning empowerment of minority students and the concept of subtractive and additive schooling as described by Angela Valenzuela (1999). Lessons from the case site are also considered more broadly in terms of the challenges and possibilities of Indigenous-serving charter schools in the current educational context.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCharter Schoolsen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Educationen_US
dc.subjectNative American Educationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Educationen_US
dc.subjectTohono O'odhamen_US
dc.subjectSchool Reformen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairJohnson, Bruce P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarty, Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVinson, Kevinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1568en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355955en_US
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